Sideless Surcoat Paper Doll Fantasy Dress

A sideless surcoat (or surcote) inspired paper doll dress for the curvy Jewels and Gemstones paper dolls. Medieval fantasy at its best.

Black and White PDF | Color PDF | More Jewels & Gemstones Paper Dolls

Thoughts on Today’s Paper Doll

Sideless surcoats look strange to me. They will probably always strike me as odd. Sometimes, I look a specific eras of fashion and I feel like- Well, isn’t that peculiar.

My personal favorite on the peculiar scale being the whole of the 1830s. I mean…. the giant sleeves, the strange Apollo-knot hair, the odd shoulder coverings/off the shoulder thing. It’s just so bananas to me. This 1830s fashion plate proves what I mean.

Wasn’t it Oscar Wilde who said that fashion was a form of ugliness so abhorrent that it had to be changed every six months? I could look that up, but that’s just more work than I feel like putting into it tonight.

Inspiration for Today’s Paper Doll
As I was amusing myself doing research into medieval surcoats for my 12th-14th century paper dolls, I kept doodling surcoats. I confess these very narrow surcoats seem odd to me, but they were the inspiration for today’s paper doll and did exist. Well, not like this, but there are real ones out there, or at least illustrations of something that could be one.

By the way, I do realize most people don’t paw around medieval manuscripts looking for surcoat illustrations for fun, but that’s their loss.

Specific Source Images: This sideless surcote and this other sideless surcoat are not exactly what I looked at, but are the right theme.

Learn/See More
On the Blog: More Jewels & Gemstones paper dolls & More Medieval Inspired Paper Dolls
Around the Internet: Nice overview of surcoats or surcotes

Last Thoughts
As far as I can tell surcoats and surcotes are the same thing, just one with more pretentious spelling. However, I am open to being proved wrong if someone would like to enlighten me.

For my patrons, there’s an different color scheme for this outfit over on Patreon today. Join us for more paper doll content each week.

Since it’s nearly Thanksgiving here in the US, I wanted to take a moment to say how grateful I am to my Patrons and my readers. You all keep me going and I deeply appreciate you.

12 Century Bliaut with Girdle

A printable paper doll with 12th century clothing including a bliaut, girdle, headdress, stockings and shoes. A great homeschooling history activity or just a fun paper doll for anyone who likes medieval fashions.

Black and White PDF | Color PDF | More Jewels & Gemstones Paper Dolls

Thoughts on Today’s Paper Doll
So, I am still working on the 1100s, 1200s and 1300s paper dolls. The 1300s paper dolls aren’t even drawn yet. So, I’m sticking with the 1100s and 1200s. I’ll get to the 1300s when I have a moment.

Anyway, meanwhile, there’s this 1100s gown known as a bliaut. Can I confess that I’m not sure how to pronounce that word? Anyway, it’s the wide sleeved garment that most of us associate with the medieval era. Despite being popular in pop culture, it’s actually gown there’s a lot of debate about how it was constructed.

The bliaut was worn by men and women, often in layers. The length seems to have been regional. In France, they look really long, but in Germany there’s often a shorter bliaunt illustrated over a longer kirtle. So, there seems to be some variation in the regional styles.

Inspiration for Today’s Paper Doll
Okay, so I looked at a lot of pictures and a lot of statues and I read a bit. Here’s what I understand: The bliaut is the subject of a lot of debate, as I mentioned above. Statues of the time show a very wrinkled, almost pleated fabric effect (like this), but illustrations by and large don’t. When they do show horizontal wrinkles across the abdomen they tend to be more subtle (like this). Additionally, smaller statuary (like this one) doesn’t show wrinkles across the abdomen.

There are, at the moment, several theories as to why and how wrinkles abdomens got formed, from cutting the fabric on the bias and lacing the sides (to create wrinkles across the stomach) to making a separate bodice and attaching it to the skirt.

I chose to go with a more subtle wrinkled look in my illustration, because outside of the giant statuary outside French cathedrals,  the wrinkles just don’t seem the tight or distinct in the art of the time.

Specific Source Images: Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres Statuary (see this picture) & Stuttgart WLB, cod. bibl. fol. 57, origin: Zwiefalten abbey circa 1125-1130, f. 55 as pictured here (retrieved 9/9/2019).

Learn/See More
On the Blog: More Jewels & Gemstones paper dolls, more paper dolls from the Medieval era, Topaz with her 1100s underwear
Around the Internet: Illumanu (a tumblr devoted to manuscript illustrations of clothing & dress), an interesting webpage with lots of pictures, and an interesting site with lots of pictures in German (I think?)

Last Thoughts
While I don’t have a real opinion on how bliauts were constructed, I do find it interesting the amount of debate there seems to be out there on the topic. The only theory I find least plausible is the separate bodice with skirt theory. I’ve seen some illustrations that seem to back it up, but never with proper citation. Cite your sources people! Additionally, separate bodices  would have had to have been invented and then ignored for like 300 years and that just seems implausible. Not impossible, mind you, but implausible. However, I always love to hear from folks to know more than me on these topics, so share away in the comments.

(But do try to keep it polite. I’ve had strange debates and oddly angry emails over medieval clothing before which, odd the true, still boggles my mind.)

Mean while, on Patreon, there’s an extra paper doll outfit every Friday! Plus previews of what I’m working on, polls and whole different paper doll series called Vivian. It’s a fun group. Check it out!

And if you need a paper doll with proper hair and undies for this era, grab Topaz in her 1100s underwear. The 1200s Lapis can also do in a pinch, if you’re more partial to redheads.

Sweet Style for March 2019! Collaboration Paper Doll

A coloring page focused on food/sweet fashion clothing.

Black and White PDF | More of the Paper Doll Collaboration 2019

Thoughts on Today’s Paper Doll
As my long time readers know, I’ve teamed up with some amazing paper doll artists around the internet Julie of Paper Doll School, Melissa of Miss. Missy’s Paper Dolls  and Boots of Popculture and Paper Dolls to create a shared paper doll project every month.

Life was nuts last month, so I skipped it, but this month I was excited for the “sweet/food” clothing theme. I chose to keep things kinda simple by using food items as graphics on some contemporary clothing pieces.

Inspiration for Today’s Paper Doll
My two big inspirations were sprinkles and the things that sprinkles can go on- cupcakes and ice-cream cones.

Specific Source Images: Nothing really specific this time.

Learn/See More
On the Blog: There’s the 2017 Collaborative Paper Doll Project and the 2018 Collaborative Paper Doll Project
Around the Internet: My partners in crime- the lovely Julie of Paper Doll School, the remarkable Melissa of Miss. Missy’s Paper Dolls, and the delightful Boots of Popculture and Paper Dolls

Last Thoughts

Be sure to check out the versions of this today’s theme from Paper Doll School, Miss. Missy’s Paper Dolls and Popculture and Paper Dolls.

We all looked at it quite differently, which for me is my favorite part of this process. I love seeing how different people create for the same theme.

My Version of the Innocent Pierott

A Pierrot inspired paper doll costume to print and play with.

Black and White PDF | Color PDF | More Jewels & Gemstones Paper Dolls

Thoughts on Today’s Paper Doll
Pierrot is a stock character of pantomime and commedia dell’arte, a semi-improvised form of Italian masked theater that had a huge impact on the arts of Europe. It’s one of the oldest forms of clowning. And by clowning, I don’t mean the sort of half-decent party clown, I mean the highly difficult art form that often requires actors to wear masks, do acrobatics and be funny- all the same time. Respect clowns. It’s a darn hard art form.

Pierrot developed in the late seventeenth-century, making him a younger stock character than most of the other stock male characters in commedia dell’arte. Interestingly, Pierrot has evolved over the years. He started out as a naive buffoon, pining after the beautiful Columbina, but inevitably losing out to Harlequin (another stock character) and never learning his lesson. Over time though, the sort of innocence of Pierott became seen as a sympathetic character.

Interestingly, Pierrot is also heavily featured in artwork. Often see as representing the innocence of the artist in the cruel unforgiving world. It also helps, not doubt, that his traditional outfit is so distinct- white face, white smock, loose white pants. I love how the costumes of commedia dell’arte stock characters are so distinct. You know immediately who is who which was, one should note, kind of the point.

One of these day’s I’ll do Harlequin or Columbina, but I haven’t gotten around to that yet.

Inspiration for Today’s Paper Doll
Obviously, today’s Pierott inspired outfit is based on Pierott’s traditional outfit of white smock, loose white pants, fluffy buttons, hat and ruff around his neck. I modified it, obviously, but that’s the basic theme. Sometime around the 1920s, Pierott’s costume added black to the white. You don’t see it much before that. There’s also some gender-bending in that era where you see very feminine Pierott images appearing. So, my lady costume for Pierott isn’t totally out of the realm of possibility.

Specific Source Images: Paul Legrand as Pierrot circa 1855, this Pierott costume and this 1920s Pierott

Learn/See More
On the Blog: More Renaissance Inspired & More Jewels & Gemstones Paper Dolls
Around the Internet: Wikipedia’s long article on Pierott. Quick Overview of commedia dell’arte, & TV Tropes nice overview of Stock Characters in commedia dell’arte.

Last Thoughts
A few of my favorite Pierott’s in art include- Schwarzer Pierrot from 1908 by Fritz Erler, Pierrot & Arlecine (Harlequinn) from 1914 by Russian artist Alexandre Jacovleff, and Self-portrait as Piero from 1911 by Zinaida Serebriakova. If you’re interested in checking out a few more of the clown.

I actually have a strange affection in  my heart for masked theater. If you can actually find some that is well done, it’s a really fascinating art form. I digress.

My Friday Patreon outfit is also theater inspired, but in a more circus sense. Join us on Patreon if you’d like to check it out. Support through Patreon is what keeps PTP around.

Do you like clowns? Do they freak you out? (No shame if they do.) I personally am cool with clowns (and have known a few), but I admit that the sterotypical clown outfits do nothing for me.

A 14th Century European Kirtle & Shoes

A 1300s kirtle for a paper doll with matching shoes and headdress from paperthinpersoas.com. A great way to teach kids history and a super fun coloring activity.

Printable Black & White PDF Printable Color PDF More Paper Dolls & Clothes
In the world of 14th century dress in Europe, there’s a lot of layers. On Monday, you got to see the shift, the stockings and the shoes which were the first layers. Over that, women wore a kirtle.

Technically, add a girdle (belt) to keep your purse (which was also as close as anyone got to having pockets in the 14th century) and you were fulling dressed. This kirtle example has a spiral laced front and buttons on the cuffs.

Her girdle is based on this example. I looked at a lot of carved sculptures of the Virgin Mary when designing this set like this one and this one.

Her shoes come from Stepping Through Time by Olaf Goubitz. It’s a great resource. Her stockings would have been held up by garters, because bias cut wool doesn’t stay up on its own. However, based on my current understanding, the stockings would be rolled down over the garters to cover them, so that’s why the garter’s aren’t visible. 

If you want a historical doll to wear this example of 1300s clothing, than you can go grab Alice whose wearing a shift and has many pair of period shoes. 

Right now, I am thinking about what to do with Paper Thin Personas in 2019. I have a poll and please answer it if you haven’t. 

Should I continue the Dames & Dandies into 2019 or do a new annual project in 2019?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

And leave me a comment if you like or consider supporting the blog on Patreon if you want to pledge. Here’s a post about how Patrons have helped

Need a doll to wear today’s paper doll clothing? All the A Pose Dolls & Clothing

A Fantasy Maiden Paper Doll Gown in Sunset Colors

A fantasy maiden gown for a paper doll in sunset colors with accessories from paperthinpersonas.com.

Printable Black & White PDF Printable Color PDF More Paper Dolls & Clothes
Today’s paper doll gown is a new addition to the Fantasy Maiden Series. I really wanted something that felt soft and drapy to contrast with the corset over top of it.

In my continuing efforts to come up with medieval fantasy style accessories that made sense, I gave her a primitive looking embroidery frame. 

The color scheme of today’s dress was inspired by the sunset. I wanted it to be rich and warm, which I think I worked pretty well. 

I wanted to thank the folks (there were a few) who emailed me after last week’s foray into coloring pages. Your emails were super kind. Thank you! And I learned things about people who like to color. I always love to hear from folks and it is kind emails that keep me going when I get full of ennui.

Ennui does happen occasionally. Fortunately not as much ennui as I felt when I was 14 and thought that “Darkened Shards” was a totally rational name for a paper doll website. I am not making this up- I really did have a site named that.

A few folks asked about my pets, so if you want to see my cat, she is occasionally featured on my Instagram feed which is also full of sketchbook photos, little videos of me inking and other fun stuff. 

And if you’re a Patron (or become one), there’s a second purple based color scheme for today’s paper doll gown over there.

Need a doll to wear today’s paper doll clothing? All the A Pose Dolls & Clothing

A Week of Coloring Pages: Steampunk Paper Doll Clothing

A steampunk coloring page featuring paper doll clothing for the B Pose paper dolls from paperthinpersonas.com.

Printable Black & White PDF More Paper Dolls & Clothes

This is the first steampunk inspired set I’ve drawn for the B Pose dolls. I was kinda thinking of a like a street urchin dressed up. So, there’s tools, boots and a top hat.

Everything is better with top hats.

When I design sets in black and white, I often add patterns, because I think they are maybe more fun to color? I confess I’m not much of a colorer. I think I mentioned that yesterday. So, I am kinda guessing what people like to color.

I did have way more fun dawing those tools than I should admit. There was going to be hammer, but hammers are surprisingly hard to draw, y’all. So are screw drivers, but I digress. 

Friday, there will be a cyberpunk set for the A Pose ladies. And who doesn’t need that? 

Meanwhile, let me know what you think of today’s set in a comment and, if you love the blog, think about donating to help it out over on Patreon

Need a Doll to wear today’s outfit? All the B Pose Dolls & Clothing

1 2 3 23