Ms. Mannequin Printable Paper Dolls Get 1970s Dresses


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: The dresses of 1974 like Simplicity 6605 and McCall’s 3936
A pair of 1970s dresses for the printable paper doll series Ms. Mannequin from 1974. Both are based on sewing patterns from the era.

A pair of 1970s dresses for the printable paper doll series Ms. Mannequin from 1974 to print and color. Both are based on sewing patterns from the era.

Let me be frank, I don’t really love the fashions of the 1970s, but they are starting to grow on me a little. There’s something about the bold colors and the big collars that I kinda have a fondness for.

So, I might never been a die hard “1970s YAY” kinda girl, I am at least learning to enjoy some of the looks of the era.

Last year I drew my first 1970s stuff and this year I wanted to continue dabbling in the era. While I think the Ms. Mannequin dolls look kinda odd as Vikings (their pose just doesn’t work), they make much better swinging cats of the 1970s.

Both of these dresses are based on pattern cover designs. I love using vintage pattern covers to design paper doll dresses. They are usually pretty easy to draw from too, which I am grateful for.

The dress on the left is from Simplicity 6605 and McCall’s 3936 and McCall’s 3936 which was apparently a “carefree pattern” which I think meant it was supposed to be easy to make. The dress on the right is from Simplicity 6605 which was a “how to sew” pattern. It would teach you, apparently, how to make set in gathered sleeves.

These days, I use online videos when I don’t know how to sew something, but I suppose that wasn’t exactly an option in 1974.

Also, I don’t sew people clothing. I am strictly a doll clothing sewing kinda girl.

Well, what do you all think of today’s 1970s dresses? Is this a decade of fashion you really love? Do the Ms. Mannequin dolls need maybe a jumpsuit or something to do with their dresses?

Let me know in a comment.

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Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here

Marisole Monday & Friends Get A Walking Dress from 1880


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Fashion Plate from 1880 and Things the Scare Me
An 1880s bustle dress for a printable paper doll from paperthinpersonas.com.

A beautiful Victorian printable paper doll bustle dress based on a dress from 1880. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

I am not from the south and while I use y’all, because I have picked it up after five years in below the Mason-Dixon line, I am not a local by any means. Still, there is a saying down here I’ve adopted which goes, “Can’t Never Could.”

In sort, if you say you can’t do something then you won’t try and you are dooming yourself to failure.

One of my long standing “can’t” do things has been drawing 1880s bustle skirts.

I’ve told myself I can’t draw a bustle skirt so many times, that I’ve convinced myself this is true. But I decided I was going to face my fear of 1880s bustle skirts by actually drawing one.

Step 1 was finding a fashion plate at the same angle as the paper doll to practice with. After a bit of hunting, I found this plate from 1880.

Next step was doing a draft on cheap lined paper and then doing a final on my nice sketchbook paper.

I’m actually very pleased how it came out. I might even try another one or two, but I have to find another fashion plate at just the right angle.

Not having to rotate something in my head really makes drawing it easier.

I have been thinking about trying the dress on the left of this plate, but rotating the plate before I print it so it is facing the right direction for Marisole Monday lady paper dolls. I prefer to draw from printed images rather than digital ones.

So, how did I do? Should I work on more 1880s stuff? Or is this a period that you’re not to keen on? Let me know in a comment.

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A Paper Doll Coloring Page of A Walking Dress From 1824


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Fashion plate From 1824, published in Ladies Pocket Magazine in January and boots like this and this.
A beautiful paper doll coloring page with an 1824 winter walking dress and boots. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

Today’s printable paper doll outfit is and 1820s dress, specifically a winter walking costume from about 1824. I don’t know why, exactly. It’s a fascinating decade and the fashions change very quickly. I think I sometimes find it a little too “frou-frou” which is odd given my love of the 1870s. If there ever was a “frou-frou” era, that would be it.

This 1820s dress is based on this fashion plate. The original featured a muff the size of a small pony, but I decided to omit the muff because I couldn’t figure out how it would stay on the paper doll.

I have been trying to practice my bonnet drawing skills. I am slowly getting better at them. They are surprisingly challenging to draw, but are such a critical part of 1820s dress.

Along with the walking costume and matching bonnet, I drew a quick pair of simple boots from the period, examples similar to these are here from the Met and here from the V&A.

You can see more examples of early 1800s dress on my Regency Pinterest Board.

Oddly enough, I haven’t done any other Regency/Empire historical clothing for the Mini-Maiden paper dolls. So, that might be something worth working on in the future.

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The Poppet’s Springtime 1920s Dress


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: 1920s Children’s Clothing
A 1920s child's dress with a matching hat and shoes for the printable paper doll from the Poppet series. Free to print in color or black and white from paperthinpersonas.com.

A 1920s child's dress with a matching hat and shoes for the printable paper doll from the Poppet series. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

This is the second dress of a bunch of 1920s stuff I have drawn for the Poppets paper dolls, so much so that I actually think I should really start a special series for it.

I mean, I already have two 1920s paper doll outfits and a doll finished to go up and I have another batch of it penciled. Basically, I think it is time to accept one simple fact, “I am completely obsessed with 1920s children’s clothing.”

So, I have created a new on-going Poppet’s series called the 1920s Children’s Wardrobe Collection.

I know, it’s not a very creative name.

And I failed to carefully note where I got the images for the batch of 1920s children’s clothing I have finished, but I am going to get better at citation in the future.

Also, because I am me.

Anyway, I’d love to hear what people think of a flood of 1920s children’s clothing, so let me know in a comment.

Today’s 1920s paper doll dress was based on one from I think a Sears catalog. I really loved the floral detail on the bodice and I chose bright fun spring colors. I probably should have made the shoes brown or black, but once I start coloring sometimes it gets away from me.

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A 1930s Dress to Color & Dress a Paper Doll In


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Simplicity 1781 from 1935
A 1930s dress for the Mini-Maiden printable paper doll series in black and white to print and color for free.
So, this is my first 1930s dress for the Mini-Maidens paper dolls. That surprised me, but it is true. I even went through the archives to confirm- I’ve done 1920s and 1940s, but never a 1930s dress.

The dress is based on this pattern cover from Simplicity 1781 designed in 1935. The two part dress had an optional coat which I did not end up drawing. Mostly, what I liked about the dress’s design was the super cool square belt buckle.

Yes, sometimes I’m that easy to please.

I should add that I also really liked the pockets on the button of the top and the very art deco feeling of the whole piece, but mostly… mostly I liked the belt buckle.

One problem of doing my first mini-maidens’ 1930s dress is that I don’t have a really good Mini-Maiden doll with the right hair for the era. This Hazel has 1940s hair which doesn’t quite work. The closest two choices are probably my 1920s Faye paper doll whose wavy bob is not too far off or my steampunk Greta paper doll.

Clearly, this is evidence that I need to draw more than one 1930s dress for the Mini-maidens printable paper dolls.

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The Reader2017 coupon for 25% off in the Etsy store is good for just two more days. So, if there’s something you want, I’d grab it.

Now, I am curious. Should I do more 1930s stuff for the Mini-Maidens? Is there another decade you’d like to see? Let me know in a comment.

Need a Mini-Maiden paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Mini-Maiden Paper Doll Here.

A Printable Paper Doll Dress from 1870 for Marisole Monday & Friends


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Fashion Plate from January 1870
A beautiful Victorian printable paper doll bustle dress based on a dress from 1870. Free to print in color or black and white from paperthinpersonas.com.

A beautiful Victorian printable paper doll bustle dress based on a dress from 1870. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

If I had to pick a favorite period of fashion history, I’m not sure I could. I love the 18th century, the 1920s, 1960s, the Regency, the 1300s… I could go on and on, clearly. However, if I had to pick a favorite era of the Victorian period, then the bustles absolutely win.

I love them all. I love the soft draped bustle of the early 1870s, the narrow skirted bustle of the early 1880s and the tea-tray supporting bustle of the late 1880s. I don’t care how absurd they look.

I just think they are so much darn fun.

Despite that, I have drawn very few paper dolls with dresses from 1870. I think the reason is that I’ve also been intimidated by the bustle. So many loops of fabric. So much drapery. The angle has to be just right to show off the fit. But I decided to try it this time, so here she is- a dress from 1870 for Marisole Monday & Her Friends.

Just the ladies. This won’t fit the gents.

It is based off this dress from 1870 published in The Queen, the Ladies’ Newspaper in January. Queen was an English fashion magazine that published French fashion plates and started in 1861. In 1968, it was purchased by Harpers Bazaar. Until 2006, in England anyway, Harper’s Bazaar was published as Harpers & Queen. I’ve yet to find a good online archive of The Queen, the Ladies’ Newspaper full-text, but if anyone locates one let me know. Their fashion plates are lovely.

Without the accompanying information, it is hard to know what exactly this dress was intended for. Based on the style, I am thinking a seaside nautical thing. January magazines often published the first Spring plates, so I suspect this is a Springtime outfit.

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Ms Mannequin and a 1960s Fashion Experience


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This 1960s Fashion Design
A paper doll foray into 1960s fashion with a blue and white shirt dress and tights. Free to print in color or black and white.

A paper doll foray into 1960s fashion with a mini-shirtdress and tights. Free to print in color or black and white.

Given how much I like 1960s fashion, it is a trifle weird how little of it has made its way onto the blog. I think part of that is the lack of online sources. Sadly, stuff created in the 1960s is still under copyright, because the open access date hasn’t moved forward as was originally intended. (Thank you, Disney for messing up that.)

I only have one book on 1960s fashion. To give a comparison, I have three on 1920s fashion. So, if anyone has a rec, leave it in the comments. I really should track down more, since I do enjoy the era. Today’s Ms. Mannequin outfit comes from this fashion design by Creators Studio.

The original dress was a blue and blue windowpane plaid, but plaid is my nemesis, so I omitted it.

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Meanwhile, there’s a 25% off coupon for my readers (Reader2017) good in my Etsy store until the end of the month. Nothing terribly 1960s in there, yet, but I have done some smashing evening gowns.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here

Some 1910s Clothing for my Curvy B&B Printable Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Fashion Plate form 1915

A paper doll outfit based on 1910s clothing, specifically 1915. Available to print in color or black and white.

A paper doll outfit based on 1910s clothing, specifically 1915. Available to print and color for free.

There are periods of fashion I am naturally attracted too like the 1920s and 1870s, but others that I am learning to apperciate more. One of these is 1910s clothing.

1910s clothing can be broken down into two major eras. The early part of the decade has a column silhouette, like this dress from 1912. After the beginning of World War I in 1914, the skirts begin to flare out and shorten. The silhouette becomes much freer. Today’s paper doll outfit is from 1915 and falls into this flared skirt era. Other examples of this “look” include this fashion plate from 1916, this dress or this suit.

One thing I love about 1910s clothing is the profusion of really absurd looking hats, like today’s hat from this fashion plate. I mean, really? I would say that surely no one wore a hat like that, but check out this example and this example from the Met.

See? Absurd hats abound in the 1910s. Does anyone but me kinda wish we still wore hats? Let me know in a comment.

Clearly, I need to spend more time in this era. There’s some fun stuff there.

One quick historical note: No one wore socks like the ones I drew here in 1910, but I didn’t want do deal will bare legs (which would  have been a scandal in 1910) and I didn’t want to have draw full on stockings or attach the shoes to the dress, so this was my solution. Not perfect from a historical accuracy point of view, but there you have it.

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Marisole Monday in a Women’s 1920s Golf Clothes


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Golfing Outfits from the 1920s

Women's 1920s golf clothes for my Marisole Monday & Friend's paper doll series in full color to print from paperhinpersonas.com.

Women's 1920s golf clothes for my Marisole Monday & Friend's paper doll series in black and white.

I can’t tell you how many times my father has dropped hints that I should draw some golf clothing. He’s a fan of the sport. So, today I am pleased to present some 1920s historical clothing attire for the Marisole Monday & Freind’s paper dolls.

The history of women’s sports attire has always fascinated me. By the 1920s, from which today’s paper doll outfit hails, women were participating in many different team and individual sports including basketball, tennis, archery, fencing, and, of course, golf. Golf was pretty popular in the 1920s and women’s 1920s golf clothes were being designed by big names like this golf outfit by Worth.

Most women’s golf outfits have skirts, but there were also trousers options, like the ones shown in this article about golf in advertisements. I based today’s outfit off illustrations from my two favorite 1920s fashion history books, Everyday Fashions of the Twenties: As Pictured in Sears and Other Catalogs and 1920s Fashions from B. Altman & Company, both of which are from Dover publications and are excellent resources on 1920s clothing. Sears was a more affordable company while B. Altman was much more fashionable and expensive.

Catalogs offer such a great window into what people could purchase in the past.

Anyway, I also had to draw a golf club for today’s outfit. Now, I will openly confess that I am not a skillful golfer, but I have taken a lesson or two. I based my golf club (I was not about to draw a whole set) on photos of 1920s golf clubs from Google Image Search. I know, I know. Not the best research practice.

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

Ms. Mannequin’s Summery Paper Doll Dress from 1935


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This 1935 McCalls Pattern & This 1935 Fabric
A summery paper doll dress from 1935 based on pattern covers and vintage fabric swatches. Available in color or black and white for coloring.

This is only the second historical paper doll outfit I have ever made for the Ms. Mannequin series. My last one was my second foray into Viking dress. This is a bit more current and I do think the paper doll’s pose works better with more contemporary fashions (if you can call the 1930s contemporary) than it did with Viking looks.

I suppose contemporary is really just a matter of point of view.

What I liked about the pattern cover that inspired today’s paper doll dress was the split sleeves and the wide white collar.

Confession time: The dress fabric pattern is way out of scale for what was common in the 1930s, but I found this amazing pattern swatch from the V&A and I just had to use it. The tulips felt so modern and contemporary. Obviously, I heavily adapted the pattern, so it was more of a jumping off point than anything else.

Part of what I wanted to do was a spring dress in black which isn’t a color usually associated with Springtime fashions.

What are your favorite spring colors? I love corals and yellows. Let me know in a comment.

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Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here