Marisole Monday: Folkloric Fairytale

Thumbnail link image printable paper doll {Click Here for a PDF to Print} {Click Here for a PNG to Print} {Click Here for the rest of this series}

Today’s Marisole is brought to you by the illustrations of Ivan Bilibin and Russian fairy tales and this random blog post I found of some fairy tale fashions from 2009. Also, the letter F.

I’ve also posted three new pages of clothing for the magnetic Marisole paper dolls. One is a page of fantasy clothing and the other two are historical sets of clothing. I will be posting a new magnetic paper doll set later this week which should be exciting. :) If anyone wants to print out the magnetic paper dolls, this is a great time of the year to find cheap tins all over the place. I’ve seen them at Walgreens and the Dollar Store.

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6 Responses to Marisole Monday: Folkloric Fairytale

  1. B says:

    It didn’t take long to figure out these were Russian. That fur hat gave it away!

    I want that belt and cpe; they’re cool!

    • RLC says:

      They’re more “inspired by” the folklore revival of the Seventies than on any actual real Russian folk costume, but the Eastern European flare is certainly there. The cape is probably my favorite piece.

  2. Monica says:

    I think my favorite is the shirt with the grey corset, and the gold and red gems around the sleeves. I really like this whole set, and I like the doll’s hair!

  3. Marie Louise says:

    I am also a huge fan of Bilibin. Isn’t the dress the one from the picture where she’s also holding a glowing scull? It scared me to death as a child!

  4. RLC says:

    Yes, I like that one too Monica, but the cape stays my favorite. I didn’t realize how few “bottoms” I had in this set until I posted it.

    Good catch, Marie Louise. That’s one of my favorite Bilibin images. It’s not an exact match, but the style of dress is based on a rubakha ( sometimes called a sorochka) which is a traditional Russian blouse/dresss that falls straight from the shoulders. The illustration you’re thinking of comes from “Vassilisa the Beautiful” which was published in 1899.

  5. jazz13 says:

    Oh my goodness, I think she is now my favorite of all the Marisoles!!!! (Just don’t tell them…)

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