Curves: Steampowered

steampunk curvy paper doll

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I don’t usually name my Curves paper dolls, but then I don’t usually need too. In this case it seems necessary, because how could I present the famous Adele without an introduction? Who else has fought for truth, justice and all other noble things while also being a smart young lady with an innate sense of style? With her glasses firmly over her eyes, her walking stick in hand and her gloves loaded, Adele faces off with the Mars Men, the strange otherworldly beings from the next dimension and still manages to lay a proper table for tea. Truly a lady to be admired by us all.

Is it obvious I’ve been spending a lot of time with Victorian three volume novels?

On an unrelated note, one of my goals for the last few days of drawing has been to stretch myself a bit with the paper dolls, so expect to see more pattern and more detail. The plaid on the vest is an example. I’ve always been scared of plaid, but I think it turned out okay.

Fashion Doll Friday: Florence’s Traveling Suit

Today we have a traveling suit for Florence’s trousseau. I have known I needed one of these for her, so I went onto finding a fashion plate.

Autumnal traveling suits for Florence from 1873.

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Florence’s┬ápaper doll traveling costume is based on this fashion plate from the NYPL’s digital gallery (I say based on because it is fairly obvious where the paper doll clothes and the actual plate deviate). The dress is labeled in German and my German is practically non-existent.

Kleid aus einfarbiger und gest... Digital ID: 804190. New York Public Library

I’ve been meaning to ask my German speaking co-worker to translate it for weeks and keep forgetting. I tried babelfish and it didn’t exactly work. It game me an answer, but the answer made no sense. Truth be told, I don’t know if its a traveling suit or not, but it looks fairly similar to others I have seen. Anyway, Florence is my paper doll and if I want to declare this her traveling costume, I darn well can. My life might be full of other sources of chaos, but my paper dolls do as they are told… sometimes.

Suits for women were in style in the 1870’s, so it seemed only reasonable to give Florence one, since she is the most fashionable of paper dolls. I also wanted to use the opportunity to make a few tops to go with the same skirt or several skirts. I expect I shall do this more often and a smart color-er of these paper doll clothes would be wise to consider this for future mix and matchable clothing options. It was common to have two bodices to go with one skirt during this era, so one bodice might be a formal dinner dress while the other bodice would be an afternoon or a visiting costume. The very smart lady (or paper doll, in our case) could, of course, turn an afternoon costume into a visiting costume by adding the right jewelry and a smart hat.

Here is Florence, just in case you missed the first post in this series.

Suiting Up: Curvy Paper Doll to Print

curves-suiting-up-paper-doll-150

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Sometimes, when I’m feeling a little glum, I dress up. I put out my clothing the night before classes (all my classes are in the morning, which is rough) and I wake up early and I get all dressed up. I feel better when I’m dressed up. I find when I’m feeling out of it, I often rely on my sweaters and slacks to just get by each day. But I think when I feel like I look good, my mood improves.

I have no idea what any of that has to do with my blog or these paper dolls, but I just felt like sharing.

Today’s Printable Paper Doll: Ladies Who Lunch

A free printable paper doll with a seven piece wardrobe from paperthinpersonas.com

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Recently, I read in a fashion magazine that the “ladies who lunch” look was in. Being from the wilds of the damp north-land, I’m not totally sure what it meant, but I suspect classic refined old money sort of clothing was the thing. Though I am not totally proud of how this set turned out, part of keeping a printable paper doll blog is being willing to accept that not very post is perfect.

(Not that I don’t wish it was.)