The C Pose Dandies Get a Suit For Their Formal Occasions

A suit for a paper doll man to print in color or black and white from paperthinpersons.com. In color, the suit is grey with a multi-colored striped tie.

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I wanted to draw a suit for the C Pose Dandies of the Dames and Dandies paper doll series, because I think a suit is just a basic piece of clothing every person (male or female) probably needs. Most of us don’t wear them daily (though I would if I could), but I think a good suit is handy. It’s great for dates, cocktail parties, weddings, job interviews or just because you want to feel dashing.

There is nothing quite as dashing as a well cut suit. As my mother is fond of saying, “A well cut suit can hide a multitude of sins.” So, any man (or paper doll man) needs a good suit. Plus I find drawing men’s suits a little intimidating, so it is good practice for me to work on them. 

In fact, both a suit and a tuxedo (which I haven’t drawn yet) were on my initial brainstorm of paper doll clothing “basics” that I thought I needed for the gents. That original list also included pirates and post-apocalyptic, so I have gotten a lot of it drawn. Despite my best efforts, the C Pose boy paper dolls still trail behind the ladies in numbers of sets. I just can’t help it. I like drawing ladies clothing more than gent’s clothing.

Well, what do you think? Are you a a fan of suits? Hate them? What else do does the well outfitted paper doll man need? Let me know in a comment. I love to hear from you. 

Need a paper doll to wear today’s clothing? All the C Pose Dolls & Clothing

1940s Week: The Winter Dresses for the B Pose Paper Dolls

A pair of 1940s dresses for the printable paper dolls from paperthinpersonas.com. On the left, there is a suit from Adrian dated to 1943-1945 and on the right a dress from McCall's sewing patterns from 1946. Available to print in color or black and white.

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This whole week of 1940s fashion would not have happened if it weren’t for the suit on the left from LACMA. Seriously, I feel in love with that suit and then I was like, Welp, I guess I’m going to draw a paper doll with 1940s underwear and things… they spiraled from there.

You can see the suit in photos here and it was designed by Gilbert Adrian. Who was Gilbert Adrian? Well, it was one of the names used by Adrian Adolph Greenberg, a costume designing legend of the Golden Age of Hollywood. Even if you’ve never heard the name Adrian, you have seen his work. He designed costumes for The Wizard of Oz,the 1938 Marie Antoinette and over 250 other films. During the 1940s, he began a commercial fashion line from which I assume this suit is related, based on the date.

Now, the dress on the right shouldn’t be neglected, just because it’s not from a famous designer. It’s from the McCall sewing pattern company, McCall 6533 to be specific. I liked how contemporary it felt, despite being from the 1940s. I am regretting that I didn’t draw a matching hat to go with it. Clearly, I need to do more 1940s clothing to fix that act of neglect.

The purse is a bit of a mystery to me. I noted the date 1940s next to it and usually I also write down the source, but I guess I didn’t. I’ve been through my 1940s Fashion Pinterest Board, where I try to keep these things, several times with no luck. I’m sure there was a source and I am going to leave things at that.

I tried to capture the strong shoulder of the 1940s with both these pieces, though I’m not entirely sure I was successful. The 1940s is much like the 1980s in that the shoulders are broad. If you missed it, on Monday, there was a 1940s version of Beatrix. Friday there will be summery 1940s dresses to round out the set.

Meanwhile, let me know what you think about today’s 1940s dresses in a comment. I’d love to hear from you.

Need a doll for today’s paper doll clothing? All the B Pose Dolls & Clothing, but I would recommend the 1940s Beatrix if you want period underwear to match the era of these dresses.

A Fiddlehead Fern Inspired Suit for a Paper Doll Prince

A suit inspired by the 18th century and the fiddlehead fern for a paper doll prince. Free to print in color or black and white and the perfect accompaniment for any paper doll princess.

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I grew up in Alaska. And if there is one thing that is true about Southeast Alaska, it is a super green place. There’s so many trees and foliage and moss. It’s as though the whole forest is shades of green.

Among all these mounds of different green things, there were many ferns. I grew up referring to most of the ferns as fiddlehead ferns, only to learn recently that there are several species that have that common name.

The “fiddlehead” of the fern is the coiled part that develops as the fern is growing.

I wanted to design a men’s suit to go with all the floral theme, but I couldn’t think of a masculine flower. So, instead I found myself reminded that the top a fiddlehead fern looks a bit like the top of a cane.

Once that occurred to me, today’s 18th century inspired men’s suit for a paper doll prince was born. It’ll fit the C Pose paper dolls, FYI.

Yeah, I confess my brain works in strange ways sometimes.

The fiddlhead ferns trim his cutway coat, decorate the cane and his crown. Full blooming ferns decorate the sleeves. The shapes on the edges of fern leaves echo the trim on the vest. The colors of ferns inspired the green color scheme.

I mean, I could hardly make a “fiddlehead fern suit” and then turn it bright red.

Also, I should add, that fiddleheads are edible and are quite tasty sautéd with butter and garlic. On the other hand, what isn’t tasty sautéd with butter and garlic? I think I would eat shoe leather if it was covered in enough butter and garlic.

I digress.

This suit was designed, of course, for the C Pose dandies and goes with yesterday’s lily ball gown. I don’t draw a lot of prince paper doll clothing, so I had fun designing this suit and crown for a paper doll prince, or king, I suppose.

Need a a Doll to wear today’s clothing? All the C Pose Dolls & Clothing

Sprites Go Out For Date Night


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: A Lack of Sprite Suits and Cocktail Dresses
Two cocktail dresses and a suit for the Sprites paper dolls. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

Two cocktail dresses and a suit for the Sprites paper dolls. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

I wanted to create some semi-formal clothing for the Sprites. I’ve done business formal suits (here and here) and I’ve done super formal tuxedos and red carpet gowns(here), but I haven’t done semi-formal. Cocktail attire, they used to call it. Maybe people who go to cocktail parties still call it that, but I’m not much of a cocktail party goer.

Ice cream and hot chocolate parties, I am all in for. I do actually own one cocktail dress. I had to buy it for an event. It is not a dress I like to wear, but at least I own one. Last minute shopping for something like that rarely ends well.

The black dress is based on this dress from Pinterest. I’m sure the blue dress was based on something, but I don’t recall what. The suit is, well.. a suit. I mean, suits are pretty straight forward.

(Sorry gents, your formal clothing isn’t as fun as the ladies.)

I wanted to do a navy suit, because I’d already done a grey suit and black suits are kinda boring.

Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

Meet Shirou the New Sprites Gent in a Stylin’ Suit


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Suits! All the Suits!
An Asian guy printable paper doll with a dashing three piece grey suit. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

An Asian guy printable paper doll with a dashing three piece suit. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

While my second doll ever in the Sprites printable paper doll collection was Yumiko, I haven’t done an Asian guy yet for the Sprites and I wanted to do that today. I am pleased to introduce to everyone Shirou. Shirou is a Japanese name which means Fourth Son. It’s traditionally given to the, wait for it, fourth son. I though it was super fitting, because Shirou is my fourth male Sprites paper doll. The others are (in order of “birth”) Zachary, Xavier and  Víctor.

I also ended up making his suit grey which is the same color as yesterday’s suit for Teresa. Anyone want to guess my favorite suit color? (Hint: It is not Navy. 🙂 )

Back when PTP began, I was petrified of trying to draw Asian features. Mostly, it was the epicanthic fold that worried me. I was also self conscious that, as a non-Asian, I didn’t want to draw a caricature. While it has taken me a long time, I’ve gotten pretty comfortable with the whole epicanthic fold thing and come to realize there is huge variation in this feature.

See, more then you wanted to know about the epicanthic fold.

So, what do you think of today’s Sprite paper doll? Let me know in a comment. I love hearing from you all.

Want to help keep the blog on the internet? Donate on Patreon.

Oh, and tomorrow, there will be another installment of the Poppets 1920s series and on Friday, come around for the next piece in the 2017 Collab paper doll project.

Looking for something else for today’s Sprite paper doll to wear? Pick out some clothing here.

Meet Teresa the New Sprites Latina Paper Doll Lady in Stylin’ Suit


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Suits! 
A printable Latina paper doll with a grey suit named Teresa and two pairs of shoes. Part of the Sprites printable paper doll series she can wear any of the ladies Sprite paper doll clothing.

A printable Latina paper doll with a suit named Teresa and two pairs of shoes. Part of the Sprites printable paper doll series she can wear any of the ladies Sprite paper doll clothing. Print and color this paper doll.

It seemed past time to me that I should share a new Sprites face. Today I am pleased to introduce Teresa, the newest member of the Sprites printable paper doll family. In my head, she’s a Latina paper doll, but her skin-tone and coloring could be from a variety of places.

The name “Teresa” is Spanish and is one of those names where the meaning is a little unclear. It has been the name of several Catholic saints though and I’ve always had a fondness for it.

I’ve been wanting to create a printable paper doll set with suits, so today Teresa has a beautiful grey suit. I chose grey for the suit, because I love grey suits. I think it would be beautiful in a color as well. Maybe a strong purple or soft blue would look really nice.

Her shoes either match her purse or are meant to be nice basics. They do have pretty high heels… but then I love a good pair of high heels.

Yesterday, I posted this blog income report for the first quarter of 2017. I get erratic questions from folks who want to start a blog, so it might be interesting if you haven’t looked at it and care. If you don’t care, then feel free to ignore it. 🙂

Want to help keep the blog on the internet? Donate on Patreon.

Oh, and tomorrow, there will be a new guy paper doll to be added to the Sprites paper doll family. I’m super excited to introduce him and his dashing suit.

Looking for something else for today’s Sprite paper doll to wear? Pick out some clothing here.

A Fancy Valentine’s Day Affair with the Sprites Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Valentine’s Day & James Bond

I seriously thought I had done a set of suits for the Sprites before this, but I think I was thinking of the Sprite’s predecessor the Pixie and Puck series. So, here is the first suit for the Sprites gents and, I think, the first ballgown for the Sprites ladies. A bunch of first today.

Also, it’s Valentine’s Day! So, Happy Valentine’s Day! Here’s a paper doll!

On the left, there’s a tuxedo with a white jacket, very James Bond, for the Sprites Guys. On the right, there’s an evening gown for the Sprite’s Ladies.

The pink heart was supposed to be one of those padded boxes of chocolate, but I’m not sure that’s very obvious.

Looking for other Valentine’s Day paper dolls? There’s a few more options here.

Also, there’s an different color scheme for these Sprites outfits over on my Patreon page. It’s open to the public as a Valentine’s Day treat. Of course, if while you are there, you want to become a patron, well, I wouldn’t mind at all. 🙂

Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

Happy Thanksgiving! Here’s a Suit from 1860s


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Sarah Josepha Hale, 1860’s Men’s Clothing and Harvest Colors

A paper doll men's suit from 1861 featuring a cutaway coat and harvest colors. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

I’ve never done a Thanksgiving paper doll before. Personally, I have always struggled to come up with an idea that isn’t either cliche or offensive. The portrayal of Native American, for example, in paper doll form has generally been rather awful and I certainly wasn’t in the mood to do some mythical pilgrims.

So, why do a suit from the 1860s? Well, I wanted to honor Sarah Josepha Hale.

First of all, she wrote Mary Had a Little Lamb, which is pretty cool, but more then that she was the editor of the important publication Godey’s Lady’s Book, and was an advocate for Thanksgiving.

In short, Hale believed that Thanksgiving was about choosing a time to both unite as a Nation and to express our joy and gratitude for our many blessings. Given the current political climate, I cannot think of a better reason to have a holiday. Her advocacy for the national holiday began in 1846 and was successful in 1863 when Lincoln, in the midst of the Civil War, formally announced a National Day of Thanksgiving.

In celebration this year, I have drawn a suit from the 1860s, specifically 1861. I actually had a really impossible time finding a suit from 1863, so this will have to do. Keeping with the Thanksgiving theme, the suit is done in harvest colors. You’ll need a gent to wear this suit, so I recommend picking up one of the Marisole Monday & Friends guy paper dolls and outfitting him. Should you like him to have a lady date to his 1860s Thanksgiving Dinner, then here’s some 1860s clothing for the Marisole Monday & Friends lady paper dolls.

I don’t know nearly as much about men’s clothing of the Victorian era as I know about women’s clothing, so I am pretty nervous about how accurate this is, but I did my best and I think this is the first ever historical men’s paper doll outfit I have ever posted. So, please be kind to my first attempt. I also need to get some books on men’s clothing of the 19th century. Anyone got any recommendations?

Anyway, I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday with family, with friends or just with the day off.

I’d also like to take this chance to thank everyone. I am thankful for everyone who supports the blog on Patreon, who leaves a comment, who follows me on Twitter or who just comes to read. Trust me when I say, it is because of my great readers that PTP is still around.

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Guy Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

Mini-Maidens: Retro Suit from 1954


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: 1950s Suits, Obviously

A retro suit design from 1954 for the Mini-Maidens paper doll series along with slingback shoes and a beret.

When you think of the 1950s, there are really two common silhouettes. The first is the nipped in waist and the full skirt. That look is pretty flattering on myself and one I enjoy drawing, but there is another look that was equally popular.

That is the narrow skirted silhouette, like today’s suit from 1954 for the Mini-Maiden paper doll series. This design is featured in the Complete Fashion Sourcebook by John Peacock and is identified as being from 1954. My major problem with Peacock’s works is that he rarely states where he found the images he is illustrating, so it is very hard to know what the context of the suit is.

However, very similar designs can be found in many other places including the Everyday Fashions of the Fifties As Pictured in Sears Catalogs book from Dover publishing. Dover has a series of these books, one for each decade, and I could not recommend them enough.

A few more examples of this style from the 1950s can be seen in this vintage pattern cover, this vintage pattern cover and this vintage pattern cover. More 1950s fashion fun can be found on my 1950s fashion Pinterest board.

Sometimes, I think I wouldn’t mind wearing suits very day, because I love how they look. I don’t want to go back to the 1950s though, because as much as I like the clothing, I also like living in a era where the Civil Rights Act exists.

We’re on day three of our variety week and I want to know what you all think, so please let me know in a comment.

And, as always, if you like the blog, consider supporting it through Patreon.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Mini-Maiden Paper Doll Here.

Edwardian Mia: A Paper Doll’s 1908 Walking Suit


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An Edwardian paper doll's walking suit in navy blue. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

Today’s installment for Mia’s Edwardian Wardrobe is a walking suit. I figure every paper doll needs a good suit, just like every person needs one good suit.

Suits were very much in fashion for ladies at the turn of the 20th century. This one is a navy blue wool and trimmed in gold braid and grey velveteen.

Here’s the 1908 suit that today’s paper doll outfit is based on a page from this 1908 Macy’s catalog. Suits could be ordered in a variety of styles and in a variety of fabrics. The fabric selection dictated the cost of the suit- a more expensive tweed made for a more expensive suit than simple wool.

I’ll confess this is not a literal re-drawing of the source material. I ended up simplifying the suit a fair bit and I sorta designed my own hat based on some others from the era. Hats in this period got to be a bit much sometimes.  In case, you’ve never made a hat like this, here are some instructions I wrote up a while ago.

If you missed the doll to go along with this paper wardrobe, here she is from Monday.

Also, as a friendly reminder, I have printing instructions here and you can find the black and white versions of the paper doll for coloring at the top of the post.

There, I think that’s all the housekeeping for the day.

Enjoy the paper doll! As always, I love to hear what you think. 🙂