Marisole Monday & Friends Sunset Inspired Fantasy Ballgown


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Huge Skirted Ballgowns and The Colors of the Sunset

A fantasy princess paper doll ballgown in the colors of the sunset.

A fantasy princess paper doll ballgown in the colors of the sunset.

I love big skirted ballgowns. I love crazy over the top big skirted princess paper doll ball gowns.

Obviously, I am expressing this love today.

Another love of mine, from when I was a kid, are off the shoulder dresses. Generally, I blame this on being a child of the 1980s.

This ballgown was actually part of a set of two big skirted fantasy gowns I designed back in 2015. Yes, that’s right, 2015. A long long time ago, I confess.

Anyway, I found them again and I hated one of them. This one I thought, “You know, that’s not bad.”

Now, the color scheme it had back then involved lime green and orange, so that had to go. Once I had it re-colored, I actually thought it was pretty beautiful, so it wasn’t a hard decision to repost it.

So, how do people feel about big skirted ball gowns?

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Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

A Wintertime Steampunk Costume for the Mini-Maidens Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: The Greta’s Trousseau Project
A wintertime steampunk costume paper doll coloring sheet for the Mini-Maidens paper doll series. Free to print and color.
So, back in 2013, I started a project called Greta’s Steampunk Trousseau. The idea was to draw the extensive ladies wardrobe of the 19th century in a steampunk style. I added steampunk costumes to Greta’s Trousseau until about 2015 when I lost interest in the project and moved onto other paper doll things.

But, earlier this month, I was panicking. That the end of January was near and I didn’t have any Mini-Maiden paper doll posts ready for February. Searching for something to post, I discovered this wintertime steampunk costume which I had created for Greta’s Trousseau.

I thought to myself, “I swear I posted that.”

And then a through search of my archives informed me that I hadn’t.

So, because I am not one to waste a perfectly good paper doll outfit find and because everyone needs thigh high gaiters, I cleaned it up and here it is today.

As some of you know, I love Victorian fashion magazines. So, here’s me channeling my inner Victorian fashion magazine to describe today’s steampunk costume:

An elegant, but practical, promenade toilette for the colder months of the year. The jeacket has draped sleeves trimmed in fur, a high collar and a longer silouette with provides additional protection from the chilled air. The draped skirt is trimmed in fur. The long gaiters provide needed protection against winter mud and muck, while also being a practical alternative to high boots. The hat is a simple style and trimmed in wide ruched ribbon.

In case you doubt how old this design is, here’s the doodle it was based on from 2014.

So, should I take on another long term project like this? I have a few ideas for one which I am letting my Patrons vote on right now. So far the things that have been bouncing around in my head range from another steampunk thing (I do love me my neo-Victorian stuff) to a alien space princess. Everything is better with Alien space princesses.

Thoughts from y’all? Is another long term thing like this a good idea? Let me know in a comment.

Meanwhile, if you want to vote, then become a patron. Plus, the blog has a facebook page now which is pretty neat.

Need a Mini-Maiden paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Mini-Maiden Paper Doll Here.

Sprites Get Dickens Caroling Costumes for the Holidays


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Dicken’s Christmas Carol, Vaguely Victorian Fashion and Google Image Search
A pair of Dickens caroling costumes for the Sprites printable paper doll series in color or black and white. Free to print from paperthinperosnas.com.

I have never done a Christmas paper doll before. The way I’ve always figured it, there are plenty of Christmas paper dolls and I didn’t see much I could add to the genre. But since I have switched to a daily outfit posting schedule, I figured I might try it this year. So, today we have some Dickens caroling costumes for the Sprites printable paper dolls.

Dickens wrote the Christmas Carol on 1842, but there’s nothing historically correct about these outfits. In fact, I refused to do any historical research, though I did Google “Dickens Caroling Costumes” to get some ideas.

Some of the college students I work with would call that research, but I try not to think about that too much.

In fact, I would call these costumes and not clothing, because they aren’t historically correct in anyway. I knew I wanted the lady to have a bonnet and cape and for the guy to have a top hat. Beyond that, I just had fun.

I chose a holly pattern for the skirt, because I thought it was holiday and old fashioned without being too obvious.

Anyway, tomorrow is the first night of Hanukah and Christmas is on Sunday, so I would like to wish everyone who is celebrating either a really wonderful holiday. And for those who aren’t celebrating, I hope you have a great weekend with, or without, family.

Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

B&B Get a Victorian Fantasy Ball Gown


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Rosettes, Victorian Ball Gowns and Corsets

A Victorian corset ball gown for the Bodacious and Buxom curvy paper doll series from paperthinpersonas. Free to print in color or black and white.

Victorian inspired madness today. Madness!

Okay, maybe not madness… but this is a pretty over the top Victorian corset ball gown creation. Still, if you spent any time with Victorian fashions, they do get pretty over the top.

And I like rosettes. They’re fun to draw. I don’t know when things get too over the top. I mean, does the ruching do it? Or the pleated details? Or the corset? I mean, at what point do you say, “Girl, that is a bit much.”

But here’s my thing, I figure the B&B series stands for Bodacious and Buxom. What is more bodacious than a ball gown covered in three types of trimming?

I did try to make things feel cohesive (something you have to do with three trims) by using a monochromatic color scheme. This is a fantasy Victorian corset ball gown, it does not need a super contrasting color scheme to go on top of all that. Unless you really want one, in which case I direct you to the black and white version and say, “You go for it!”

Meanwhile, I am going to stick with my slightly sedate (as much as this dress could be called sedate) version here. Somehow, despite the rosettes, with these colors, this dress reminds me of winter skies.

The actual “winter” themed paper doll set for the day will be up Friday. There are carolers and my first ever Christmas paper doll.

Also, am I the only person who thinks “ball gown” should be one word and not two? Seriously.

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Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

B&B: Steampunk Street Urchin


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Newsboy Caps, Street Urchins, and Steampunk

bandb-steampunk-paper-doll-outfit

I love all things Victorian and I have an equal love for neo-Victorian styles. I saw drawing steampunk stuff back in middle school, before there even was such a thing as steampunk. I called it Victorian Punk and I stumbled across some of those drawings last time I moved. Maybe I’ll dig them out and share them with my Patrons.

And actually, I haven’t ever done B&B steampunk before, unless you count my Regency Steampunk set I did last year. This set is much less high class and much more street urchin.  Still, I love the belt. Love it.

Along with my favorite belt, there is also a newsboy cap, something I am still learning to draw, arm warmers and boots. Everything is better with boots. Personally, I also really like the yellow socks, but there is a black and white version, so feel free to color them anyway you please. Just in case you’re not as into yellow socks as I am.

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Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

Happy Thanksgiving! Here’s a Suit from 1860s


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Sarah Josepha Hale, 1860’s Men’s Clothing and Harvest Colors

A paper doll men's suit from 1861 featuring a cutaway coat and harvest colors. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

I’ve never done a Thanksgiving paper doll before. Personally, I have always struggled to come up with an idea that isn’t either cliche or offensive. The portrayal of Native American, for example, in paper doll form has generally been rather awful and I certainly wasn’t in the mood to do some mythical pilgrims.

So, why do a suit from the 1860s? Well, I wanted to honor Sarah Josepha Hale.

First of all, she wrote Mary Had a Little Lamb, which is pretty cool, but more then that she was the editor of the important publication Godey’s Lady’s Book, and was an advocate for Thanksgiving.

In short, Hale believed that Thanksgiving was about choosing a time to both unite as a Nation and to express our joy and gratitude for our many blessings. Given the current political climate, I cannot think of a better reason to have a holiday. Her advocacy for the national holiday began in 1846 and was successful in 1863 when Lincoln, in the midst of the Civil War, formally announced a National Day of Thanksgiving.

In celebration this year, I have drawn a suit from the 1860s, specifically 1861. I actually had a really impossible time finding a suit from 1863, so this will have to do. Keeping with the Thanksgiving theme, the suit is done in harvest colors. You’ll need a gent to wear this suit, so I recommend picking up one of the Marisole Monday & Friends guy paper dolls and outfitting him. Should you like him to have a lady date to his 1860s Thanksgiving Dinner, then here’s some 1860s clothing for the Marisole Monday & Friends lady paper dolls.

I don’t know nearly as much about men’s clothing of the Victorian era as I know about women’s clothing, so I am pretty nervous about how accurate this is, but I did my best and I think this is the first ever historical men’s paper doll outfit I have ever posted. So, please be kind to my first attempt. I also need to get some books on men’s clothing of the 19th century. Anyone got any recommendations?

Anyway, I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday with family, with friends or just with the day off.

I’d also like to take this chance to thank everyone. I am thankful for everyone who supports the blog on Patreon, who leaves a comment, who follows me on Twitter or who just comes to read. Trust me when I say, it is because of my great readers that PTP is still around.

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Guy Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

Monica’s Neo-Victorian Wardrobe: A Ballgown


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A fantasy ballgown with a neo-victorian flare for a printable paper doll from paperthinpersonas.com.

Happy Friday!

It seems only proper to close out the week of steampunky paper doll goodness with a ballgown, don’t you think? I mean, after all, it is the most formal of the formal. Ballgowns were just below Court Dress on the formal scale and Court Dress was pretty much as formal as it got.

Plus Court Dress came with crazy rules like it had to have a train and at one point, it had to have panniers and… I could go on.

Since it amuses me (and that’s all that matters), let’s continue this week’s tradition of 19th century style explanations of Monica’s steampunk or neo-victorian outfits, here’s my ballgown description:

An elegant ball or evening dress suitable for a young matron or unmarried lady in pale leaf green trimmed in lavender. The bodice is two tones of green with a lavender side lacing and the skirt is cut in the mermaid silhouette with curved frills of satin flaring elegantly to the floor in pale blue, lavender and green. 

One of the great things about all the outfits this week is that they are in the same color scheme, so if you wanted too, you can mix and match say the bodice of yesterday’s dinner dress with today’s skirt for a whole different look. Or I think Monday’s walking suit jacket would look dynamite with yesterday’s skirt. And those are just the first two ideas that came to me.

Quick reminder: Black and white versions can be downloaded at the top of the post. 🙂

Monica’s Neo-Victorian Wardrobe

I do want to address one other thing. I was asked my a few people (one comment, one email) if it would be possible on Friday’s to combine all the outfits of the week into one page for ease of printing. The answer is No, for two reasons. Reason 1: I actually started this format to get away from having to do layout work which is super time consuming.

Reason 2: (And this is the cool reason) These pieces wouldn’t fit on one page. Back in the old system, I would have draw two skirts and then four tops, two shoes and then a smattering of hats and other accessories. Over the course of the week we’ve had four skirts, four tops, five hats, two pairs of shoes, two parasols, one walking stick and a bag. That’s 15 pieces!

You are actually getting MORE paper doll content this way AND its less time consuming for me. Everyone wins!

By the way, I want to add that both people who asked these questions were super nice about it and I don’t mind at all getting questions and thoughts from you all. Please keep them coming.

So, on that note, questions? Comments? Thoughts? Let me know.

Monica’s Neo-Victorian Wardrobe: Accessory Thursday With Shoes, Parasols & Hats


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Printable paper doll accessories including shoes and hats! Also available in black and white. From paperthinpersonas.com.

It’s Accessory Thursday! Yay!

But to come down from the high for a moment, it has occurred to me that I’m not really sure how to write a pseudo-19th century fashion plate description of these pieces.

So, instead, I thought I would wax philosophical about accessories. In the real work, I am not a big accessories girl, but in the paper doll world, I just love them. Back when I was a kid, I had a paper doll book called, The Victorian Cat Family. It was an amazing paper doll book with literally thousands of fantastic tiny accessories all of which I painstakingly cut out.

Oh, the memories… Still love that book.

Anyway, I’m not the greatest artist when it comes to non-clothing items, but I try to spice things up with parasols, hats and shoes. Part of the fun of hats is that they change up an outfit. Also, I just love love love drawing paper doll shoes.

(Yes, I realize that is a kinda quirky thing to love. No, I am not ashamed.)

If you missed Monday, you might need a doll to wear theses fun shoes. Here’s Monica all ready for her neo-Victorian wardrobe.

Monica’s Neo-Victorian Wardrobe: A Dinner or Carriage Dress


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Printable paper doll steampunk inspired dress with a matching hat. Also available in black and white for coloring from paperthinpersonas.com.

Happy Wednesday!

All righty, Dinner or Carriage dresses were worn to evening of later afternoon events that were formal, but not formal enough to warrant full-dress. Carriage dresses are often identifiable, because they are are more fussy and formal than promenade dresses.

The basic order of formality is a walking suit is less formal then a promenade toilette which is less formal than a carriage dress. A dinner dress is less formal than a evening dress, but may also be worn to evening events like come concerts or lectures. Opera was its own insane category.

Who ever said Victorian dressing was simple?

Continuing my 19th century fashion magazines descriptions, here is today’s:

A pale blue bolero jacket with pale blue sleeve puffs worn over a lavender corset with brass button accents. The neckline of the corset is filled with a pale blue high-necked blouse. The matching skirt is lavender and trimmed in pale green with three rows of blue ruffles. The hat is a bowler style trimmed with dark purple fabric roses and a wide blue ribbon band. Without the hat, this ensemble would be a lovely dinner attire and with the hat would be appropriate for afternoon visiting or carriage rides.

I have to confess, I have never been one of those people who romanticizes history. I’m pretty much certain that I like air conditioning, indoor plumbing and antibiotics too much to want to live in the past, but sometimes when I’m working on fantasy romanticized history pieces like this series, I start to think, “Hmmm… it might be fun to get to put on fancy dresses and go to a ball!”

So tell me in a comment what era of history you’d like to visit sometime. I’ve never been able to settle on one, but I think it might be fun to visit the Library of Alexandria or the Aldine Press in Venice.

(My library geek is coming out in those choices.)

Thoughts from all of you? What time period would you like to visit?

If you missed Monday, pop over to that post for Monica and if you love the blog, consider becoming a patron. 

Monica’s Neo-Victorian Wardrobe: A House or Morning Costume


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A neo-victorian morning dress or house dress with a hat designed for the Marisole Monday & Friends paper doll series.

Today’s neo-Victorian costume for Monday’s Monica moves to a much lower rung of the formality ladder.

Today, Monica has a morning costume or a house dress. There really shouldn’t be a hat with this costume, because house dresses and morning dresses were not something women wore outside. Still, I drew a lot of hats with these outfits. So, I thought people might enjoy a spare hat today.

To once again channel my inner 19th century fashion magazine, here we go:

A lavender shirtwaist of the crispest cotton with a jabot at the neckline. The sleeves are long and go over the hands, replacing the need for gloves of any sort. Worn over the shirt waist is a decorative long corset of misty blue leather trimmed in pale green ribbon. The skirt is tightly fitted, as is the current fashion, and made to match the corset’s trimmings. There is a decorative band of tea green right before the knees and then asymmetrical layers of ruffles. The matching hat is green and trimmed in over-sized bows.

I am having way more fun writing these 19th century style descriptions of these outfits than I really should probably admit to most people.

Still, I kinda figure that if you’re reading the blog than you probably already know that I am a trifle quirky and such things shouldn’t bother you at all.

Black and white versions can be downloaded at the top of the post, as usual.

If you love the blog, please think about becoming a patron and, if you’re not up for that, leave a comment. I love hearing from y’all.