Poppets: Ice Skating in 1927


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Everyday Fashions of the Twenties: As Pictured in Sears and Other Catalogs, Bobble Hats

A 1920s ice skating outfit for a child paper doll from paperthinpersonas.com

This is the first of a bunch of 1920s clothing I have drawn for the Poppets, so I hope everyone loves this era as much as I do. I originally drew the outfits last year when I was still doing sets and then I kinda forgot about them for a few months and rediscovered them while I was cleaning up my files at the end of the year.

I always do an annual file clean up and I often discover things I kinda forgot about or abandoned because they weren’t something I really liked. Boots wrote a really brave post on her blog, Pop Culture Looking Land,  about failed projects. I wrote a follow-up over on my Patreon page for my Patrons.

Moral of the story: Sometimes, I abandon stuff and then find it again and go, “Actually, that’s not so bad.”

And this one of those things. I don’t even remember what I didn’t like about it. I think it was the ice skates.

Still now I look at them and I am like, “They’re okay. What was my problem?”

The human mind is a funny thing.

Can I make a confession? I have no idea how to ice skate. I think I have been on ice skates exactly three times and every time I ended up on my butt. It was not much fun. Still, I like watching other people ice skate, so that should be worth something.

Love the blog? Think about supporting it on Patreon (my sister just did and surely she has good taste) and I always love to hear what you think in the comments.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

Sprites In Some 18th Century Clothing Options


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: 18th Century Merchant Class Clothing
18th century clothing for paper dolls including a round-gown and a tricorn hat. Free to print in color or black and white from paperthinpersonas.com.

18th Century paper doll clothing in black and white

This 18th century clothing for the Sprites paper dolls are meant to represent the Merchant Class. On the left, for the men, we have a jacket and vest worn over a shirt. His breeches, stockings and shoes are all mid-18th century. On the right, for the lady, we have a round-gown, defined by the lack of a stomacher. A handkerchief fills her low neckline and she has a matching cap, stockings and shoes.

In the United States in the 18th century, there were four social classes. You could be wealthy, merchant class, lower class or in some for of bondage, such as enslaved or indentured. In England, these classes were defined by birth. So, it was entirely possible to be a Merchant and make more money than a Lord, but you were still in the middle class. Unless you could marry off your son or daughter into a higher social status and then… Well, we have the plot of one of a million 18th century romances.

I should add that the merchant class didn’t just include merchants. Anyone involved in a trade like lawyers, doctors and clergy were considered middle-class. It wasn’t until the late 18th century that Barbers were separate from Doctors.

If you’re interested in learning more about 18th century clothing, you can check out my 18th Century Pixies series. I talk a lot in there about the ladies clothing of the era.

Alternatively, one of my favorite 18th century costume history books is What Clothes Reveal. I used it a lot for these, because it shows what “middle-class” people wore, rather than just what those with lots of cash wore. Colonial Williamsburg also has a decent overview of 18th century clothing. If you’re not sure where to start, start there.

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Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

Sprites Get Dickens Caroling Costumes for the Holidays


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Dicken’s Christmas Carol, Vaguely Victorian Fashion and Google Image Search
A pair of Dickens caroling costumes for the Sprites printable paper doll series in color or black and white. Free to print from paperthinperosnas.com.

I have never done a Christmas paper doll before. The way I’ve always figured it, there are plenty of Christmas paper dolls and I didn’t see much I could add to the genre. But since I have switched to a daily outfit posting schedule, I figured I might try it this year. So, today we have some Dickens caroling costumes for the Sprites printable paper dolls.

Dickens wrote the Christmas Carol on 1842, but there’s nothing historically correct about these outfits. In fact, I refused to do any historical research, though I did Google “Dickens Caroling Costumes” to get some ideas.

Some of the college students I work with would call that research, but I try not to think about that too much.

In fact, I would call these costumes and not clothing, because they aren’t historically correct in anyway. I knew I wanted the lady to have a bonnet and cape and for the guy to have a top hat. Beyond that, I just had fun.

I chose a holly pattern for the skirt, because I thought it was holiday and old fashioned without being too obvious.

Anyway, tomorrow is the first night of Hanukah and Christmas is on Sunday, so I would like to wish everyone who is celebrating either a really wonderful holiday. And for those who aren’t celebrating, I hope you have a great weekend with, or without, family.

Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

B&B: A Steampunk Arctic Explorer


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:Arctic Explorers, Photos of Ladies on Glaciers in High Heels, and Fur Trim

A steampunk arctic explorer outfit for my curvy paper doll series. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

This week’s “winter” outfit is this set of winter time steampunk arctic explorer clothing, because why not? I mean, everyone needs to have something fab to wear while exploring the arctic, don’t they?

I know nothing about arctic exploration, except what I know from living in Alaska and having to study the history of the state in school. My sister is a professional geologist and she has done crazy things like ice coring, but I didn’t ask for her advice.

I did try to be a bit practical with a skypole/walking stick with a spike and I went with trousers. I’ve seen 1890s photos of women on glaciers wearing high heels, so she got heels, but I wonder if maybe I should have drawn her some ice cleats or something. I’ll have to think about that next time I draw a steampunk arctic explorer outfit.

Maybe I should have asked Sis for advice. 🙂

This is only my second EVER steampunk inspired B&B paper doll outfit. I can’t believe that, but a quick foray into my archives does tell me it is true. Wow.

I have get on that in the New Year.

By the way, today’s post, as with all my posts, is possible because of my amazing Patrons, so think about giving a donation to help or following the blog on Twitter or  leaving a comment or telling a friend about it or posting it to social media. Every little thing helps!

Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

B&B: Steampunk Street Urchin


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Newsboy Caps, Street Urchins, and Steampunk

bandb-steampunk-paper-doll-outfit

I love all things Victorian and I have an equal love for neo-Victorian styles. I saw drawing steampunk stuff back in middle school, before there even was such a thing as steampunk. I called it Victorian Punk and I stumbled across some of those drawings last time I moved. Maybe I’ll dig them out and share them with my Patrons.

And actually, I haven’t ever done B&B steampunk before, unless you count my Regency Steampunk set I did last year. This set is much less high class and much more street urchin.  Still, I love the belt. Love it.

Along with my favorite belt, there is also a newsboy cap, something I am still learning to draw, arm warmers and boots. Everything is better with boots. Personally, I also really like the yellow socks, but there is a black and white version, so feel free to color them anyway you please. Just in case you’re not as into yellow socks as I am.

If you want to support PTP, please becomea Patron, follow the blog on Twitter, leave a comment, or tell a friend about it.

Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

Ms. Mannequin: Running Away to Join the Circus


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  My Circus Pinterest Board and my Love of Boots

A circus inspired paper doll outfit for the Ms. Mannequin series from paperthinpersonas.com. Free to print in color or black and white.

I have this odd fondness for vintage circus art. While I can’t really explain it, I mostly think I like vintage posters in general and old photos. By far the strongest influence on today’s paper doll outfit was my circus Pinterest board. Also, like my Ancient Greek fantasy gown from Tuesday, I realized I haven’t done much Circus inspired stuff since my Marisole Monday & Friend’s set from 2014.

Several years ago, my National Novel Writing Month project involved a circus. I never finished it, but that’s okay. Is anyone doing NaNoWriMo this year? I usually do, but I confess I’m not this time.

Anyway, I think this is the sort of circus outfit that is probably worn more often by burlesque dancers than actual circus performers, because I don’t think you can do trapeze in those boots, but then again, I don’t know much about actual circuses or their performers. Let’s be honest, here.

Still, I think there’s a lot of interesting things you can do visually with circus imagery.

Meanwhile, what do you think of today’s paper doll outfit? Let me know in a comment!

And if you’re interesting in what happens “behind the scenes” then join Patreon. There’s a whole different blog devoted to all things “backstage” there.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here

Mini-Maidens: Retro Suit from 1954


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: 1950s Suits, Obviously

A retro suit design from 1954 for the Mini-Maidens paper doll series along with slingback shoes and a beret.

When you think of the 1950s, there are really two common silhouettes. The first is the nipped in waist and the full skirt. That look is pretty flattering on myself and one I enjoy drawing, but there is another look that was equally popular.

That is the narrow skirted silhouette, like today’s suit from 1954 for the Mini-Maiden paper doll series. This design is featured in the Complete Fashion Sourcebook by John Peacock and is identified as being from 1954. My major problem with Peacock’s works is that he rarely states where he found the images he is illustrating, so it is very hard to know what the context of the suit is.

However, very similar designs can be found in many other places including the Everyday Fashions of the Fifties As Pictured in Sears Catalogs book from Dover publishing. Dover has a series of these books, one for each decade, and I could not recommend them enough.

A few more examples of this style from the 1950s can be seen in this vintage pattern cover, this vintage pattern cover and this vintage pattern cover. More 1950s fashion fun can be found on my 1950s fashion Pinterest board.

Sometimes, I think I wouldn’t mind wearing suits very day, because I love how they look. I don’t want to go back to the 1950s though, because as much as I like the clothing, I also like living in a era where the Civil Rights Act exists.

We’re on day three of our variety week and I want to know what you all think, so please let me know in a comment.

And, as always, if you like the blog, consider supporting it through Patreon.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Mini-Maiden Paper Doll Here.

Hip-Hop Ms. Mannequins: Shorts & A Beanie


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A hip-hop fashion inspired paper doll outfit. Free to print in color or black and white.

This last August has been hot. Really hot. And super humid. August’s like this make me hate Alabama with a deep fiery passion. While it is now September and technically fall, the heat doesn’t seem to have caught onto that idea. So, today I’m posting paper doll shorts and a t-shirt to try to make up for some of the blistering heat out there.

Times like this, I really miss the damp cold of Juneau, Alaska where I grew up. (Right now, all my friends in Juneau are like, You are crazy.)

Anyway, today’s hat was a bit of a trial. The curls of the paper doll, Zola, give her a fairly wide hair style and the hat had to be wide enough to fit over that. I think it rather altered the look of the hat, so I am less then overjoyed about how to turned out. Sometimes, paper doll logistics bite you in the butt, you know?

So, my move happens tomorrow, Saturday, and Sunday. I mention this, because I will be slow to answer comments and email. Also, I’ll be really grouchy, so you probably don’t want me to be answering anyway.

Until then, if you missed the paper doll to wear this stylish outfit, she was posted on Monday. If you are thinking, but I want a different paper doll to wear this stylish outfit, than hop over to the Ms. Mannequin dolls category.

Last but not least, there is a black and white version linked at the top of the page.

Hip-Hop Ms Mannequins: Blue Windbreaker and Grey Sweatpants


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A paper doll outfit inspired by hip-hop fashions featuring a blue windbreaker and baseball cap. Free to print in black and white or color from paperthinpersonas.com

A big part of hip-hop fashion seems to be athletic wear inspired. So, today’s outfit is too. It’s a pale blue windbreaker with grey sweatpants and a matching baseball cap.

If you’re thinking- “She needs some cute white tennis shoes to go with that outfit” than hop over to Monday’s post where I have Zola who has a pair that I think would look really good with these pieces.

I am getting better at drawing baseball caps every time I draw one. Who knew? Practice really does help.

The black and white versions are at the top of the post, as usual. Also, as usual, I recommend printing from the PDF for best results.

So, I’ve also been trying out Instagram, but I am struggling a little. Still, follow me if you want to see some sketchbooks photos and also pictures of my baked goods. And of course, there’s Patreon if you want to help support PTP, plus the blog is on twitter @paperpersonas. It amuses me that my blog has a more active social media life than I do.

All right, any hip hop fans out there, I am trying to learn more, so I am looking for music recommendations. Please feel free to leave one in the comments or anything else in the comments. I like comments.

Hazel Visits the 1940s: Afternoon Dress from 1940


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mini-maiden-paper-doll-dress-1940

I think it’s a little fitting that at the end of this 1940s paper doll to print week, we are returning to the early part of the decade with this 1940s afternoon dress, especially since we started with a 1940s afternoon dress on Monday. Today’s dress is based on this afternoon dress from 1940 which I found from the New York Public Library Digital Collections.

This dress has many of the details I associated with the 1940s including puffed sleeves, a natural waistline and a gored skirt that falls to the knees, but the ruching details on the bodice are very much of the 1930s. Fashion doesn’t change on a dime, so it’s a nice example of the transition of styles.

The truth is that the 1940s is a fascinating era for fashion. World War II influences everything, of course, but there’s also more women entering the work force, the end of the Depression and Rayon, invented in the 1930s, becaming mainstream. Paris, which was occupied by German forces, was no longer the center of fashion and New York came into its own.

Now you might be wondering, if all that’s true, where can I see more cool 1940’s fashions? Well, I have a whole Pinterest board devoted to the decade. I will confess it’s a little bit of a harder decade to research, because much of the material is still in copyright. However, you can still find stuff around if you dig.

Hazel & Her Wardrobe: A 1940s Paper Doll to Print & Color

In other news, I signed a lease, so I am now in the midst of hard core packing. I think I have enough backlog saved up that the blog will continue as usual, but I will be slow to reply to comments or emails and such until the end of September, I think.

I hope everyone has a great weekend! I’ll be spending mine packing up boxes.

As always, I love to hear what people think in the comments.