Marisole Monday’s Paper Doll Steampunk Outfit in Bright Colors


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: My Steampunk Fashion Pinterest Board and This Photo
A steampunk Marisole Monday & Friend's printable paper doll outfit in bright colors to play with from paperthinpersonas.com.

A steampunk Marisole Monday & Friend's printable paper doll outfit in black and white to play with from paperthinpersonas.com.

When I was creating today’s paper doll outfit, I was thinking about steampunk fashions. I was heavily influenced by this steampunk outfit I found on Pinterest. I particularly liked the two-tone skirt design, which I hadn’t seen before. In truth, I think I copied it a little more closely than I usually feel comfortable with, but that is neither here nor there.

I am still learning to draw top hats, so today’s steampunk paper doll outfit was good practice. I am getting better at them, but I also think hats a generally challenging for me.

Still, I will not get better if I don’t try.

When it came time to color this Marisole Monday & Friends paper doll outfit, I knew I was not going with a traditional steampunk color scheme. I just get so bored with browns and creams after a while.

Of course, if you are looking at this and going, “That is not what I want from a steampunk outfit.” Never fear!

There’s a very traditional steampunk color scheme version on the Patreon page for anyone to download. And of course, if you decide you’d like to donate to support the blog while you’re there, than I would certainly appreciate it.

As always, I’d love to hear what you think in a comment!

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

Regency Paper Doll Clothing For the Sprites Printable Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: I looked at a lot of stuff to design these, but here are a few this fashion plate, this jacket, this dress and these shoes
A set of regency paper doll clothing to print from paperthinpersonas.com with a man's suit and a woman's day dress and shoes. The pieces are designed to fit the Sprite paper doll series.

A set of regency paper doll clothing to print from paperthinpersonas.com with a man's suit and a woman's day dress and shoes. The pieces are designed to fit the Sprite paper doll series..

I wanted to dabble in regnecy men’s fashion today. In part, because I have been reading a lot of regency romance novels lately. The Regency is also an era where I really love the men’s clothing. I think the women’s clothing is pretty nice, but the men’s clothing really enchants me.

As many of you know, I’m not quite as comfortable with men’s fashions as I am with women’s fashions in history. I can pretty well eyeball women’s clothing from the last 300 years and make a good guess at the era, but men’s clothing remains harder.

It’s partly that I find the changes more subtle and partly that I’ve never had a much of a passion for it.

But since I do love drawing for the Sprites, so I have been slowly trying to face my fears of men’s historical clothing. Which brings me to back to today’s set of regency paper doll clothing, that I created using a variety of reference images.

The man’s suit was based on this suit, this jacket, this suit and this suit. The dress is based on this dressthis dress, this dress and this dress. Her shoes are based on this pair, this pair and this pair. Because the dates on the source pieces range from the early 1800s until about 1820, I chose circa 1810 as the best middle ground date to describe these pieces of regency paper doll clothing.

Every time I post something “new” to me, I feel a little nervous, especially because I know that this is a era of fashion history that many people are very passionate about. Still, I hope to do what I do which is learn more and keep improving my understanding of the fashions of the era.

After all, every paper doll I create is a work in progress.

Looking for some Sprite paper dolls to wear these outfits? Pick out Sprite paper dolls here.

A Fitted Dress from 1956 for the Ms. Mannequin Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Vogue 8972, A Sewing Pattern from 1956A paper doll dress based on a pattern cover from 1956 for the Ms. Mannequin paper doll series in grape purple.

A paper doll dress based on a pattern cover from 1956 for the Ms. Mannequin paper doll series to print and color.

I’ve written before that part of what I like about drawing from fashion magazines is the simplicity of it. You see a shirt. You draw the shirt.

Thanks to the Vintage Pattern Wiki, I can apply a similar feeling to drawing vintage historical paper doll clothing. There are hundreds of vintage pattern covers in the Vintage Pattern Wiki, so if I feel like drawing 20th century clothing than I find it doesn’t take a lot of energy to track down something I like and draw it. I just pick a decade and start looking.

I’ll openly grant that this isn’t exactly the best research practice, but it’s fun and I like picking out things to try to recreate.

Today’s dress from 1956 comes from Vogue 8972. The Vogue pattern company began as a feature in Vogue magazine. In 1909, Conte Nast bought Vogue magazine and the pattern company was formed in 1914. This was around the same time most of the other big name pattern companies were getting started as well.

It might be confirmation bias, but Vogue patterns, even today, seem to be more couture styled than others.

When I chose to draw Vogue 8972, I thought it was an afternoon or dinner dress, but the pattern isn’t specific. I chose to make my a grape purple, because I like purple.

I am a little concerned that I might have made the skirt a bit shorter than it should be, but fashion figures have such freakishly long legs it can be hard to tell where the skirt actually stops.

There’s a few other patterns from the mid-1950s with similar narrow skirted silhouette are McCall’s 3461Vogue S-4627, Simplicity 1678, McCalls 4615 and Advance 8368. There are dozens of others, but those were a few I thought shared traits with today’s paper doll dress.

Well, what do you think of the 1950s? It is a favorite fashion period of yours? Let me know in a comment.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here

B&B Russian Fantasy Outfit


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin and kosovorotka shirts

A set of fantasy paper doll clothing inspired by traditional Russian clothing from paperthinpersonas.com. One of hundreds of free printable paper doll designs.

A set of fantasy paper doll clothing inspired by traditional Russian clothing from paperthinpersonas.com. One of hundreds of free printable paper doll designs.

Personally, I blame my fascination with all thing Russian on growing up in Alaska and reading The Hunt for Red October at far to young of an age. I hope you all will interperate today’s paper doll outfit as an expression of love for the art of Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin and not a statement on current events in the United States.

(I’m not really sure what a fantasy Russian outfit would be saying about current events, but that’s neither here nor there.)

I’ve loved Russian fairytales for most of my life. Well, I love all fairy tales, but the Russian ones I think resonated with me more than a lot of the others. Perhaps it was growing up in Alaska where there was a lot of Russian culture still or perhaps I saw in Ivan Biliban‘s illustrations a landscape I recognized- over grown forests and snow.

In fact, I sometimes think my fondness for flat color and heavy line is in part because of the exposure to those illustrations. At the time, those things were a limitation of the printing medium, but Biliban took advantage of them to make incredible works of art. It really was the golden age of children’t book illustration.

Anyway, today’s set of printable paper doll clothing consists of a traditional Russian style blouse, a corset, trousers tucked into books and a big fur hat. Everything is better with a big fur hat. The blouse is based on a kosovorotka which is a side fastening men’s shirt.

See? I did some research.

Questions about today’s paper doll outfit? Thoughts on other wonderful classic children’s book illustrators? Let me know in a comment!

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Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

Poppet Printable Paper Doll’s Little Miss Muffet Costume


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:Little Miss Muffet and Kate Greenaway

An late 18th century inspired Little Miss Muffet costume in pink and cream with grey shoes for the Poppet's printable paper doll series from paperthinpersonas.com.

An late 18th century inspired Little Miss Muffet costume to color and play with for the Poppet's printable paper doll series from paperthinpersonas.com.

Today’s Poppet paper doll dress is a Little Miss Muffet costume. In case anyone doesn’t remember the nursery rhyme, it goes like this:

Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet,
Eating her curds and whey;
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.

So, I did a little research on the rhyme. It turns out that its origins are unclear (not uncommon in nursery rhymes) and it was first published in 1805. The truth is that you will sing ANYTHING to a baby to get it to stop crying (trust me, I know) which means many nursery songs have their origins in popular or political ballads.

When designing today’s Little Miss Muffet costume, I wanted something that was colored with cream accents, rather than cream with colored accents. I was inspired by Kate Greenaway‘s illustrations, but only in the sense that I like her work and always tend to think of it when I start drawing late 18th century inspired children’s clothing.

Okay, I know the rhyme involves a spider, but I am not a big fan of spiders and I was not about to draw one. Deal with it. Instead I made a bowl of curds and whey, which is a dish I’ve never eaten or really know anyone who has eaten.

Have any of you, fair readers, actually eaten it? I know it’s a dairy dish, since curds and whey are both part of the cheese making process.

Her shoes are pretty classic 18th century style (you can see a bunch more like them on my 18th Century Clothing Pinterest Board). She also has a mob-cap which may or may not fit depending on which Poppet doll you put it on.

You can check out my Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhymes board on Pinterest to see some more of my inspirational images and, of course, you can check out the rest of the Fairy Tale and Nursery Rhyme series for more fairy tale and nursery rhyme inspired paper dolls and outfits.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

The Poppet’s Get a 1920s Spring-Time Dress and Matching Cloche


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:1920s Children’s Clothing- One of my True Loves
A 1920s inspired paper doll dress for the Poppet printable paper doll series. Free printable in black and white or color from paperthinpersonas.com.

A 1920s inspired paper doll dress for the Poppet printable paper doll series. Free printable in black and white to color from paperthinpersonas.com.

Today’s Poppet 1920s Children’s Wardrobe Collection contribution is a spring time dress. I sort of thought of it as an Easter dress when I designed it, but Easter was a few weeks ago. I chose a pale color scheme with soft blue and pink for the dress. With the dress is a matching cloche, because lord knows the 1920s loved a good looking cloche.

I know I’ve spoken before about how much I adore 1920s children’s clothing. There’s just something about clothing of that era that I adore. I have equal love for children’s clothing of the 1930s, but I haven’t had as many opportunities to draw that.

Maybe that’s a project for another time.

I openly confess that I don’t have a good record of what I used as reference when I drew today’s dress. I am pretty sure I used Children’s Fashions 1900-1950 As Pictured in Sears Catalogs, 1920s Fashions from B. Altman & Company and/or Everyday Fashions of the Twenties: As Pictured in Sears and Other Catalogs. All of these books are from Dover which is a great source of reasonably priced fashion history books. I think I own almost all their 1920s fashion books.

The realization that fashion history books are a justifiable business expense has made it a lot harder to talk myself out of buying them.

I do realize that recently most of what I have posted for the Poppet’s paper dolls to print have been either from the Fairy Tale project or the 1920s project. Never fear, there are also normal clothing on the horizon. I mean, even paper dolls need jeans.

So, what do you think of today’s 1920s paper doll dress? Love it? Hate it? Wish it was purple? Let me know in a comment.

Meanwhile, if you want to support the blog, then think about becoming a Patron or liking it on facebook and tune in tomorrow for a paper doll outfit inspired by one of my favorite novels.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

Marisole Monday & Friends Get A Walking Dress from 1880


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Fashion Plate from 1880 and Things the Scare Me
An 1880s bustle dress for a printable paper doll from paperthinpersonas.com.

A beautiful Victorian printable paper doll bustle dress based on a dress from 1880. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

I am not from the south and while I use y’all, because I have picked it up after five years in below the Mason-Dixon line, I am not a local by any means. Still, there is a saying down here I’ve adopted which goes, “Can’t Never Could.”

In sort, if you say you can’t do something then you won’t try and you are dooming yourself to failure.

One of my long standing “can’t” do things has been drawing 1880s bustle skirts.

I’ve told myself I can’t draw a bustle skirt so many times, that I’ve convinced myself this is true. But I decided I was going to face my fear of 1880s bustle skirts by actually drawing one.

Step 1 was finding a fashion plate at the same angle as the paper doll to practice with. After a bit of hunting, I found this plate from 1880.

Next step was doing a draft on cheap lined paper and then doing a final on my nice sketchbook paper.

I’m actually very pleased how it came out. I might even try another one or two, but I have to find another fashion plate at just the right angle.

Not having to rotate something in my head really makes drawing it easier.

I have been thinking about trying the dress on the left of this plate, but rotating the plate before I print it so it is facing the right direction for Marisole Monday lady paper dolls. I prefer to draw from printed images rather than digital ones.

So, how did I do? Should I work on more 1880s stuff? Or is this a period that you’re not to keen on? Let me know in a comment.

Want to see sketchbook drafts of this dress? There’s up on Patreon. Join to check it out! And, you know, help keep the blog on the interwebs.

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

The Poppet’s Springtime 1920s Dress


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: 1920s Children’s Clothing
A 1920s child's dress with a matching hat and shoes for the printable paper doll from the Poppet series. Free to print in color or black and white from paperthinpersonas.com.

A 1920s child's dress with a matching hat and shoes for the printable paper doll from the Poppet series. Free to print and color from paperthinpersonas.com.

This is the second dress of a bunch of 1920s stuff I have drawn for the Poppets paper dolls, so much so that I actually think I should really start a special series for it.

I mean, I already have two 1920s paper doll outfits and a doll finished to go up and I have another batch of it penciled. Basically, I think it is time to accept one simple fact, “I am completely obsessed with 1920s children’s clothing.”

So, I have created a new on-going Poppet’s series called the 1920s Children’s Wardrobe Collection.

I know, it’s not a very creative name.

And I failed to carefully note where I got the images for the batch of 1920s children’s clothing I have finished, but I am going to get better at citation in the future.

Also, because I am me.

Anyway, I’d love to hear what people think of a flood of 1920s children’s clothing, so let me know in a comment.

Today’s 1920s paper doll dress was based on one from I think a Sears catalog. I really loved the floral detail on the bodice and I chose bright fun spring colors. I probably should have made the shoes brown or black, but once I start coloring sometimes it gets away from me.

If you’d like to support the blog, then donate a little each month and become a Patron. It really helps.

Plus, if you haven’t checked it out yet there is also a new blog facebook page where I am sharing stuff from the Archives, as well as announcing new posts when they are posted.

I think that’s all my general announcements for the moment. 🙂

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

Marisole Monday & Friends Now Have an 1820s Inspired Winter Walking Dress


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Pelisses from the 1820s, such as this one from 1822
A fantasy winter walking costume for a paper doll based on pelisse of the 1820s from paperthinpersonas.com.

A fantasy winter walking costume for a paper doll based on pelisse of the 1820s from paperthinpersonas.com in black and white for coloring.

First of all, Happy St. Patrick’s Day and this paper doll has nothing to do with it. 🙂

Last Friday, I shared a ballgown inspired by the late 1860s, but today I have a winter walking costume inspired by the 1820s pelisse like this one from 1822, this one from 1818 and this one from 1825. It is the companion piece to last week’s printable paper doll dress.

The pelisse from 1822 was the one that was today’s paper doll gown’s strongest influence.

I went back and forth about the color scheme for a while, but I really wanted to do something in the red family. As it happens, I super like red.

Monochrome color schemes aren’t something I do much, but maybe I should play with them more. I find I often go back to the same colors for paper doll clothing over and over again.

I was trying to get all my wintery paper doll stuff backlog taken care off before it gets too warm, but frankly the weather has been freakish.

It keeps switching between Spring, in the 70s, and Winter, in the 30s and 40s. I don’t really care which one it chooses, but I dislike having to check my phone every morning to see if I need to grab my coat.

That’s enough complaining about Alabama’s wacky spring weather.

Meanwhile, if you want to support the blog, then think about donating through Patreon. I’ve opened up two example behind the scenes blog posts one with sketchbook photos and one where I talk about how I decide what to work on, so if you like those then seeing more just costs a dollar a month.

Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

Some 1910s Clothing for my Curvy B&B Printable Paper Dolls


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Fashion Plate form 1915

A paper doll outfit based on 1910s clothing, specifically 1915. Available to print in color or black and white.

A paper doll outfit based on 1910s clothing, specifically 1915. Available to print and color for free.

There are periods of fashion I am naturally attracted too like the 1920s and 1870s, but others that I am learning to apperciate more. One of these is 1910s clothing.

1910s clothing can be broken down into two major eras. The early part of the decade has a column silhouette, like this dress from 1912. After the beginning of World War I in 1914, the skirts begin to flare out and shorten. The silhouette becomes much freer. Today’s paper doll outfit is from 1915 and falls into this flared skirt era. Other examples of this “look” include this fashion plate from 1916, this dress or this suit.

One thing I love about 1910s clothing is the profusion of really absurd looking hats, like today’s hat from this fashion plate. I mean, really? I would say that surely no one wore a hat like that, but check out this example and this example from the Met.

See? Absurd hats abound in the 1910s. Does anyone but me kinda wish we still wore hats? Let me know in a comment.

Clearly, I need to spend more time in this era. There’s some fun stuff there.

One quick historical note: No one wore socks like the ones I drew here in 1910, but I didn’t want do deal will bare legs (which would  have been a scandal in 1910) and I didn’t want to have draw full on stockings or attach the shoes to the dress, so this was my solution. Not perfect from a historical accuracy point of view, but there you have it.

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Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.