Meaghan’s Fantasy Gowns: Her Final Gown


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First of all, Happy Friday to all!

This it the last of the fantasy dresses for paper dolls this week and it is actually one of my favorites. I’ll confess it wasn’t one of my favorites when I first designed it, but it has grown on me and now I’m sorta loving it. (That might be the teal talking. I have a deep affection for teal.)

Sometimes my fantasy sets come with a well formed world in my head and other times they are just a chance to play with a specific silhouette that interests me. This week’s series of garments certainly falls more into the “silhouette” that intrigues me category. It would be inaccurate to suggest that I started with a clear idea of the “world” and then created the dresses.

Never the less, seeing them all together as I get to do on Friday, some idea of the universe from which these dresses come can be formed.

Given the paper dolls delicate shoes, I think it is safe to say that she either rarely goes outdoors, it is the middle of summer or she is living in a place where foot protection isn’t needed. So, I think we are dealing with an urban enviorment. Hiking through the woods in those sandals? I do not think so.

All her dresses are long and most are quite flowy. While this is beautiful, it sure isn’t practical. I think therefore we can assume that she is wealthy enough to not be concerned with practicality.

So, in the end, I think we’re dealing with a princess or a noble woman in a society where she doesn’t have to worry about hurting her feet and can spend time practicing her flute. Not a bad life I don’t think for my paper doll.

A Fantasy Paper Doll & Her Gowns

So, my challenge to you is, what do you think of her life? What stories do you think this paper doll collection tells? Let me know in a comment and have a fantastic weekend!

Meaghan’s Fantasy Gowns: Her Third Paper Doll Gown


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An elgant paper doll fantasy gown with a matching circlet. Deisgned to fit the Marisole Monday & Friends paper doll series. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

Clearly, this is not Accessory Thursday. This, “Hey it’s a dress” Thursday which, I will confess, does not roll so smoothly off the tongue.

I put the accessories, which were shoes, on Monday with the doll, because they were NOT very interchangeable among the various Marisole Monday & Friends. I am soliciting opinions about this decision in a poll below.

One way in which this week’s dresses have diverged from my other dress is that I didn’t have a specific color scheme in mind. I tried to stick to colors that all sorta went together, but I didn’t start out with a clear plan. Since I am spreading things out over a week, I don’t feel as beholden to a color scheme as I once did.

This paper doll gown is actually the design that inspired the whole set. In my head, the vest she wears has the long skirt attached to it and is made from a thick black velvet trimmed in gold braid. The berry pink fabric is a heavy cloth, but the cream fabric is softer.

Her circlet is made from soft leather with decorative beads. I intentionally made it longer on the sides, so that you can adjust it to the dolls head as needed to get a good fit. If you missed her, here’s the doll from Monday.

By the way, just out of curiosity, I have a poll about Accessory Thursday.

Do you miss Accesory Thursday?

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Tomorrow, there’s an elegant teal gown and, as usual, the round-up of the whole set of printable paper dolls for your ease of printing.

As always, I love to hear what people think in a comment.

Meaghan’s Fantasy Gowns: Her Second Paper Doll Dress


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A paper doll fantasy dress design in teal and cream. It fits the Marisole Monday & Friend's paper dolls.

As I promised yesterday, today there’s some music to do with yesterday’s flute.

The process of designing fantasy paper doll dresses usually begins with a silhouette. For example, I wanted all these dresses to be high-waisted and very full at the hem making a distinct a-line shape. Each gown also has an “over-robe” and an “under-robe” creating a consistent look. This is part of what I think about each set. I’m really not designing “four dresses”, rather I’m designing a week of themed dresses, so I try to think about a connecting thread either with a time period (like I did for the Poppets of the 1860s) or a stylistic choice- like making all these similar in their silhouette.

I’m not suggesting for a micro-second that this is always easy, but I find I think better in themes, though once in a while, I am tempted to just do a random week of whatever occurs to me; however, I don’t know if that style would be sustainable for me for a long period. I like being organized, what can I say?

I blame it on the librarian in me.

The librarian in me is also why I like drawing books for my paper dolls so much. I tried something kinda new here in that I drew an open book, rather than my usual closed book. I know basically nothing about music, except how it was printed and that’s hardly much to use when one is trying to play it. I faked my “music notes” here just to give it something that clearly wasn’t text. I think this might be my first music book, so maybe the other paper dolls with instruments just play by ear?

If you missed Monday, here’s the paper doll to go with this dress, though it will fit all the Marisole Monday & Friend’s paper dolls, so there’s no reason not to share.

By the way, I am currently collecting people’s thoughts on the new format after six weeks. If you haven’t tossed in your two cents, please do in a comment. If you have already tossed in your two cents, feel free to toss them in again. I won’t mind.

Meaghan’s Fantasy Gowns: Her First Gown & Flute


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Fantasy gown for a paper doll! The doll to wear the gown is available on paperthinpersonas.com along with a lot of over lovely gowns.

Fantasy gown for a paper doll! The doll to wear the gown is available on paperthinpersonas.com along with a lot of over lovely gowns.

I used to feel a little guilty about princess paper dolls. I love fairy tales, especially classics like The Twelve Dancing Princesses and East of Sun, West of the Moon. Yes, the whole commercial empire that is the Disney Princess phenomena made me uncomfortable. I wondered, and still do wonder, about the messaging little girls receive about femininity, relationships, and power.

On the other hand, I like drawing fantasy dresses. I enjoy them and I have been asked by little girls if I have any “princess” paper dolls. When they ask this, they aren’t really asking for the sociopolitical role that a princess play. Rather, they want a girly doll with pretty dresses. So, I’ve learned that sometimes it is important to categorize things as “princesses” for the ease of people looking for “fantasy gowns.”

That brings us to this week’s theme of fantasy gowns for Monday’s paper doll, one of the many versions of Maeghan. I have no idea if she is a princess or not, I leave that up to all of you too decide.

What I do know about her is that she is a musician, because with today’s printable fantasy gown we have a flute. I played the flute briefly in Middle School. I was not a very skilled flue player, but that’s neither here nor there. As it happens, I have no musical talents to speak of.

If you missed the paper doll, here she is, but I also think any of Marisole Monday & Friend’s girls- Marisole, Monica, Mia, Maeghan and Margot would look good in this paper doll dress. I particularly think this Mia paper doll with her red hair would look great in that dark periwinkle color.

Tomorrow, there will be another fantasy gown and a book of music, so that’s fun.

As always, I’d love to hear what you think in a comment. Currently, I’m soliciting opinions on the new format six weeks in.

Maiden: A Printable Princess Paper Doll

logo-maiden-fantasy-bwAnother printable princess paper doll this week. Clearly, I was in the mood to draw fantasy dresses. I did think about trying to get some other sets done and then breaking up my princesses, but in the end, that just didn’t work out. So, May has become a month of printable princess paper dolls for the Marisole Monday & Friends crowd and people are just going to have to deal.

So, in the 12th century, there was this garment called a “bliaut.” Now, I’ll be honest, I am still learning about 12th century clothing, but in my limited research the “bliaut” was a wide sleeved gown with a full skirt. The most famous example, I know of, is from the sculptures on the exterior of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres. Another example is the Unshaw Virgin from the British Museum. I’m still mid-research to create a historical 12th century paper doll, so while I work on that, I thought I would draw a fantasy paper doll inspired by the 12th century.

A black and white printable princess paper doll with four gowns, two pairs of shoes and some accessories. She can share clothing with a lot of my other paper dolls as well. Free from paperthinpersonas.com.

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Along with the 12th century, Maiden here owes a bit to Norse things with her bone comb and her knife. I think she could be a generation or two removed from my Maiden of the North paper doll from last year or maybe from the same “world”, but a different geographic region. I also think Marcus as a Warrior fits in as well.

Now, I will confess that I did try to make something very different from Monica’s Dreaming Princess set here. Despite the fact that they are both fantasy paper dolls with a distinctly princess vibe, the styles are pretty different. Maiden here is all about the 12th century while Dreaming Princess was all about the early Italian renaissance look. Plus, while Dreaming Princess was modeled by Monica, Margot is the model for Maiden, a title picked entirely because it fit in the space I had left after rearranging this set like a dozen times.

For colors, I wanted to use shades that reflected manuscript illustration. While Dreaming Princess was me channeling my inner-8 year old. This paper doll was much more my taste which tends towards more muted colors when I think of fantasy gowns.

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Now, next Monday, there will be something completely different!

(Well… not really. It’s a paper doll, but not a princess paper doll.)

Also, if you’re wondering, “Who is this Margot person Rachel keeps referring too?” Than allow me to refer you to the Guide to Marisole Monday & Her Friends.

Questions? Comments? I’d love to know what you think of today’s paper doll.

Hazel’s Futuristic Fashions: A Paper Doll Coloring Sheet

Mini Maidens Logo- Hazel's Futuristic Fashions See this is where I would LOVE to say that this was some grand plan of mine to counter balance my post-apocalyptic paper doll set from last Friday against today’s futuristic paper doll coloring sheet, except that I totally didn’t plan it out that well. I am NOT that organized- except when I am and on those occasions, expect bragging.

The truth is that I am out of backlog which is hyper rare for me and not very fun, so I literally was working on this paper doll set at 11:30 last night, trying to get it all saved and then woke up early this morning to write this post before work. I do not like working this way, Sam I am. I do not like it at all.

So, hopefully this weekend (during which I do not have to work), I will finally be able to sit down and work solidly for a few hours and get some paper dolls ready for blog food. For the blog is like a monster, as I once explained, and it hungers.

Today, it gets to snack on a futuristic fashion paper doll with thirteen pieces. I have to confess I was a little jealous of Boots “separate head” method of making paper dolls while I struggled to think about all these high necklines on these paper doll clothes. But I guess you can always print out too, cut one’s head off and glue it to the other paper doll if you like. What’s a little paper doll surgery among friends?

Hazel's Futuristic Fashions is a paper doll coloring sheet featuring a futuristic/sci-fi clothing. There's eleven pieces of clothing, including two pairs of boots. She's free to print from paperthinpersonas.com

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So, if the B&B paper doll last week was ready for the end of the world, I think today’s paper doll is much more about a semi-utopian future with glass dome houses, lots of white and probably space ships. You know, a very Star Trek kinda place.

To make her shirt on the left with the ridged shoulder, you’ll need to attach the floating tab, because the shoulder pieces stick out above the shoulder and otherwise the garment won’t fit properly. Just an FYI for everyone.

I have been seriously considering trying out Periscope to film myself maybe live inking a paper doll set? Is that something people would find interesting? Worth trying out or no?

Lillies & Birds: A Printable Paper Doll Coloring Page

lilliesandbirds-logo-bwThe trouble of posting from paper doll backlog, is that sometimes I get to the point where I’ve drawn something so many weeks ago that I have no real recollection of what I was thinking or planning when I designed whatever it is. This is one of those sets. I remember drawing it, but I don’t remember much about this set except worrying about drawing the lily flowers on her skirt and hat.

I decided I tend to always draw the same flowers and I wanted to try something different.

Beyond that, I feel like I can’t say much.

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Margot is showing off this set. I feel rather bad for Margot, since she hasn’t gotten a set since April when she was a Tudor lady. I think it is just that she got a LOT of love at the beginning of the year and then very little for the rest of the year.

Anyway, this is the last Margot set for 2015. The year is wrapping up my friends. 🙂

As always, if you have thoughts, please share them in the comments and if you like the paper dolls than consider supporting them through Patreon.

Also, there’s going to be a really fun Q&A on Wednesday with a special guest from Dover publishing. I’ve been waiting to publish this for weeks. 🙂

Round Gown, Court Gowns and a Caraco Jacket: 18th Century Paper Doll Dresses

logo-18th-cent-3Four more 18th century dresses for the Pixie paper dolls today. So, by now I think I’ve already covered the various sorts of gowns women wore in the 18th century with a fair bit of detail.

On the left, we have a caraco jacket and a square hooped court gown. The caraco jacket was inspired by this gown from LACMA. The court gown was based on this gown in style and this gown in color scheme. Square hooped court gowns like this one were the most formal of a ladies wardrobe and, like court gowns generally seem too, stayed in style even after square hoops were disappearing else where.

Moving to the right, we have a dress based on this gown from the MFA in Boston and a round gown from the Met. Round gowns were the least formal of all these gowns.

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Most of my color choices here came from the source gowns above. My favorite of the gowns, the caraco jacket with petticoat on the upper-left was the most painful to color. Those detailed floral patterns get my every time, but I just love the way they look. There is something about 18th century sprawling viney florals that I can’t get enough of. Even in my own house, I have an apron in that style of pattern that I wear while baking and simply adore.

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I should say, I think, word about her hat. There are small dotted lines along the outside edges of the ribbon and you will need to clip those if she is going to wear her hat, as well as cut out the white area. That is best done with a sharp blade, like an exacto knife. I don’t usually use an exacto knife in my paper doll cutting (I am clumsy with those things), but for some things it really is the most effective option.

If you’ve missed any parts of the 18th Century Pixie Series, they all can be found here.

Polinanise and Stomachers: 18th Century Gowns for Paper Dolls

logo-18th-cent-2In my first page of gowns for my 18th century paper doll series, I talked a lot about different styles of gowns. I did not, however, talk about stomachers. So, a stomacher was a triangular shaped piece of cloth that was pinned or sewn in place to fill in the bodice of gowns. Most gowns had either an actual separate stomacher or something that looked like a stomacher. In today’s collection of gowns, they all have stomachers, except the polianse gown which is front fastening.

On the left side, the first gown is a polinase style based on this gown at the V&A. The lower gown was my rather poor attempt at capturing looped silk fringe which was very much in style in the 18th century. I believe this was the gown I started from, but I’m not totally pleased with the resulting outcome.

The first gown on the right was my attempt at the caraco jacket sort of garment with a stomacher. This example from the Met is a similar style. The gown on the bottom-right is based on this gown where the stomacher extends below the closure of the coat like bodice.

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When it came time to color these gowns, I knew I was going to color the polinase gown the same way as the source gown which made things quite simple. The gown below it was inspired by the green in the stripes of the original. I chose brown for the top right gown to match the more casual nature of the caraco jacket style. While the bottom right gown is based a vibrantly colored gown, I chose a white and pastel gown from the 1770s as my color inspiration.

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The two different sized caps on the page are needed to accommodate the difference in hairstyles between Joy and Faith. There will be a third Pixie doll for this series, but she won’t be up for a while. After this there is another page of gowns, I think. I have four pages of gowns and three pages of dolls, so you can see there’s a little bit of a challenge as far as going doll, gowns, doll…

If you’ve missed any of this collection, here’s the 18th century Pixie series thus far.

18th Century Gowns: Round-Gown, Brunswick, and Sack-Back Gown

logo-18th-centToday, we have out first set of 18th century gowns for the paper dolls, including a round gown, a brunswick and a robe à la française.

Until the introduction of high-waisted dresses at the very end of the 18th century, most women’s garments consisted of a skirt or petticoat and a bodice. In garments like round gowns, less formal and/or worn by the middle classes, the bodice would fasten in the front and there would be a separate skirt. The far left paper doll costume is a round-gown, based on this round gown from the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Sometimes, the bodice would come down partly over the skirt creating a jacket like affect. These mid-thigh length bodices were called caraco jackets. Here, for example, is an extant caraco jacket from the LACMA. Later in this series, there will be caraco jackets, but our middle gown is not a caraco jacket, but rather a brunswick. Brunswicks were traveling garments, often hooded, that had long sleeves. Though relatively practical, they were made of fine fabrics like silk- which makes one wonder about the whole “traveling” thing. Anyway, you often see Brunswick’s in art, but the V&A has a rare extant version which would have had removable sleeves. I based my Brunswick’s on two portraits- Lady Mary Fox and Alexander Roslin’s Portrait of the Girl Holding a Spaniel.

If the bodice and skirt were attached to each other in the 18th century, the skirt would be open in the front to reveal the petticoat underneath. This style of gown was called a robe à l’anglaise, closed bodied gown or an English gown if the pleats in the back of the bodice were stitched down. However, if the pleats were allowed to fall open and loose than the gown became sack-back gown or robe à la française. In modern times, this gown has been called a Watteau back or Watteau gown, after a painter who painted a lot of this style. The dress to the far right of today’s paper doll set is a sack-back gown, but I think the style is easier to see through extant examples like this robe à l’anglaise and robe à la française, both from the Met’s collection.

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Along with the gowns, today’s set includes a pair of slippers with overshoes based on this set from the Powerhouse Museum Collection. Over shoes were worn to protect the shoe from mud and muck, though I wonder how much protection a brocade and leather pair could have granted. I’ve also included several different styles of hats. My goal with the hats in this paper doll series is less to match specific dresses, but rather to provide enough variety for there to be plenty of choices. Women did not always wear their hair covered, but usually did.

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My color choices for these gowns were taken from my 18th century color pallet which I showed off in last week’s paper doll post. I chose pale blue for the round gown, since the source gown is blue striped, bright yellow for the brunswick, and a rich teal-blue color for my first robe à la française. That is certainly the most formal of the gowns from today’s set. The shoes were done in a neutral light brown color to go with any of the dresses.

In case you missed part one of this series, here is the entire collection so far. Next week, we will have our second paper doll- Joy.