A New 1920s Poppet Printable Paper Doll


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Children’s Fashions 1900-1950 As Pictured in Sears Catalogs
A paper doll of the Poppet series with brown skin, black hair and brown eyes. She has a 1920s set of underwear and two pairs of shoes.Today’s paper doll is a new addition to the 1920s Children’s Wardrobe Collection. My love of 1920s fashion is pretty well documented on the blog, just check out the 1920s tag.

So, for the last year, I’ve been drawing a lot of 1920s children’s clothing. The late 1920s to the early 1930s are perhaps my favorite era in the 20th century. None of the looks would look decent on me, but I adore them.

So far, I’ve drawn 5 dresses for the Poppet’s paper dolls 1920s Children’s Wardrobe Collection. It seemed high time that I added another new doll to the project. So, now my Louise Brooks clone paper doll has a friend.

Along with her shoes, today’s Poppet paper doll to print has a pair of combinations based on several different sets I’ve seen. I drew her so long ago, that I confess I’m not certain about my sources.

So, this may be a 1920s experience in feel, more than a precise act of historical research.

Anyway, I super hope you enjoy her and I really think she’d pretty cute. I’ve got a few more 1920s pieces drawn before I need to work on more. And there will be more.

Need a some clothing for today’s Poppet paper doll? Pick Out Some Clothing Here.

Rapunzel, Rapunzel Let Down Your Long Paper Doll Hair


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Rapunzel
My Rapunzel paper doll is printable and has a long braid of hair. Her skin is a soft brown color and her hair is darker brown. Her dress is two layers in darker and lighter teal. She has matching shoes.

My Rapunzel paper doll is printable and has a long braid of hair.

The Fairy Tale and Nursery Rhyme series continues today with a Rapunzel paper doll. Certain fairy tales need a doll to really share them. After all, Rapunzel is only Rapunzel if she has super long hair.

After some technical debate about how to mange the super long hair, I decided to make the braid a separate piece, so that it could be pasted to the back of the head. That way you an easily slip the tabs around the paper doll’s body.

One of the challenges of depicting fairy tales is the overwhelming presence of Disney. If you search for images of Rapunzel, the images from the Disney film Tangled overwhelm all other depictions.

The last thing I wanted to do was copy Disney and I don’t really like their version of Rapunzel, so I decided there was going to be no pink in my version.

My Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhymes board on Pinterest to see the non-Disney related images I used to inspire my version of Rapunzel.

The Fairy Tale and Nursery Rhyme series contains a lot more storybook characters. There’s currently six paper dolls and outfits in the series, but I have a few more waiting in the wings.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

A 1920s Poppet Paper Doll to Print and Play With


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:1920s Children’s Clothing & Frannie Fisher on PBS
A 1920s paper doll with underwear and two pairs of shoes. Part of the Poppet printable paper doll collection from paperthinpersonas.com.

A paper doll coloring page to print with underwear and two pairs of shoes based on 1920s clothing. Free printable in black and white to color from paperthinpersonas.com.

So, with all the 1920s paper doll clothing I have been drawing lately, it seemed dumb not to have a 1920s Poppet paper doll to wear it. This is the first of what I hope will end up being two or three 1920s Poppet dolls, but for now I am calling one a victory.

I am also a huge Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries on PBS fan and it seemed to me that the best 1920s doll would be one with Phryne Fisher’s coloring which means dark hair and pale skin. This was very fashionable look for women of the 1920s thanks to the movie star Louise Brooks. The paper dolls hair is based on Louise Brooks.

I gave our 1920s paper doll a period slip with attached drawers and lace accents. I also wanted to give her two pairs of shoes to wear with any of the 1920s collection dresses or any of the other Poppet clothing. She has the same skintone as Poppy, Paradisea and my Vintage 1950s one.

Her side-glancing eyes are a nod to Lenci dolls, one of my favorite doll companies of this era.

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Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

Poppet Paper Dolls Play At Snow White


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:Snow White
A Snow White paper doll printable with a dress, apple and shoes. Free printable in color or black and white from paperthinpersonas.com.

A Snow White paper doll printable with a dress, apple and shoes. Free printable in black and white to color from paperthinpersonas.com.

One of my long term projects this year has been drawing fairy tale and nursery rhyme inspired Poppet paper dolls. You can find them all under the creatively named Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhyme Poppet Series. Today, there is a Snow White paper doll. Other fairy tales I have been working on are Hansel & Gretel and Little Red Ridinghood. I’ve already posted Little Bo Peep and the Princess and the Frog (though I did that one long before I started the series.)

In some fairy tales the look of the main character hardly matters, but Snow White is not one of those fairy tales. The 1857 edition of Brother’s Grimm contains the tale of Snow White and it opens like this:

“Once upon a time in midwinter, when the snowflakes were falling like feathers from heaven, a queen sat sewing at her window, which had a frame of black ebony wood. As she sewed she looked up at the snow and pricked her finger with her needle. Three drops of blood fell into the snow. The red on the white looked so beautiful that she thought to herself, “If only I had a child as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood in this frame.”

It seems somehow wrong to create a Snow White paper doll without giving her super pale skin, black hair and red lips. Her skin isn’t actually white, but it is fairer than any of the other skin tones I have ever done for the Poppets. So, she won’t be sharing shoes that show flesh with anyone.

For her dress, I wanted to show some of forest elements that are so integral to the story, hence the trees and butterflies. In the 1857 version of the tale there are three attempts on Snow White’s life.

The first is with a bodice lace (like a shoe lace but for a corset) that is laced so tight it strangles her. The second is with a poisoned comb and the third is the apple attempt. I did not draw a comb, but I did was to give my Snow White paper doll a lace up bodice to reference that first attempt.

Of course, the 1857 version also ends with Snow White and the Prince torturing the Evil Queen to death with red hot shoes. As usual, older Fairy Tales are a trifle violent and rather dark.

Meanwhile, if you want to support the blog, then think about donating through Patreon. If you’re not sure wha the behind the scenes blog posts are like here’s two I’ve opened to the public- sketchbook photos and Some Stuff about my Process.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

A Pink Haired, Green Skinned, Butterfly Winged Fairy Poppet Paper Doll


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Unisex Children’s Clothing, Fig & Me Dolls, Untied Shoes, and Twig & Tale Sewing Patterns

A pink haired, pale green skinned, printable fairy paper doll. Part of the Poppet series and free to print in color or black and white.

A printable fairy paper doll. Part of the Poppet series and free to print in color or black and white.

One of my Patron requests for 2017 was more fantasy creatures like mermaids and fairies. So, today’s fairy Poppet paper doll in my response to that request from Cathy W and I thought someone else, but I couldn’t verify that. So, other person who I couldn’t verify, if you exist outside my head, this is also for you.

Who doesn’t want an excuse to draw a printable fairy paper doll?

Seriously for a moment though, I was sort of surprised by the request for more fairies. One of the oddities of my brain is that I assume everyone has the same knowledge of my archive as me. So, sometimes when someone says, “Hey, could you draw…”

I think- “But I did draw that.”

Except sometimes it turns out that paper doll was like four years ago and I’m the only person who remembers that I drew it. So my first reaction to being asked for fairies was to think, “But I’ve done fairies.”

And then I paused and looked at my Archives and I was like, “Oh. Not as much as I thought.”

Also, just because I have done something once, doesn’t mean I can’t do it again. There’s not like statute of limitations on paper doll production, you know?

Anyhow, this is all a convoluted way of saying that I plan to do more mermaids and fairies in 2017. (In fact, come back February 21st, that’s all I’m saying…)

The wings are meant to be glued to the back of the paper doll along the white section. Last time I posted a fairy with wings, there was some confusion about this.

Meanwhile, if you want to support the blog, then think about becoming a Patron or liking it on facebook.

Mostly, I am using Facebook to share stuff from the Archives, because I expect no one to really go through nearly 1,000 posts. Not quote 1,000. I should do something cool when I hit 1,000.

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick a Poppet Paper Doll Here.

Meet a New Natural Haired Poppet Paper Doll


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Curls, BJDs and Cute Sandals
Meet my attempt to draw a black paper doll with natural hair she has panties, shoes and a purple and white dress. Part of the Poppet paper doll series from paperthinpersonas.com. Free to print in color or black and white.

Meet my attempt to draw a black paper doll with natural hair she has panties, shoes and a drop waisted dress. Part of the Poppet paper doll series from paperthinpersonas.com. Free to print and color.

Once in a while, a paper doll face comes out just as I imagined it. And this is one of those paper dolls. I think she’s very cute and I couldn’t be more pleased with how she turned out. I was a little scared to draw a paper doll with natural hair, so I hope she looks okay.

As with my last Poppet paper doll, I didn’t name her, but feel free to do so yourself. She has the same skin-tone as Petal, so they can share shoes. I indicated that by making the paper dolls bases the same color.

The Poppets paper doll body design was based on by Ball Jointed Dolls (BJDs) sold by companies   like VolksIplehouse and Fairyland. While BDJs are beautiful, they can be super expensive. Plus, as they are made of resin, they can’t be in direct light and have to be handled while wearing gloves. I just can’t imagine owning a doll that I was scared to touch. One of the best parts of printable paper dolls is that if one gets damaged, it is not big deal. Just print another one.

There’s no specific BJD that inspired today’s brown skinned Poppet paper doll, but I like to mention the original inspiration for the Poppets when I can. I don’t think of the Poppets as “real” children, but rather dolls. I loved paper dolls of dolls when I was a child, especially the ones by Peck-Grande like this one from Ebay.

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Need more clothes for today’s Poppet paper dollFind Additional Outfits Here.

Poppet: Vintage Paper Doll with Her Lavender Dress


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A vintage school girl blond printable paper doll with a dress, two pairs of shoes and a stuffed cow. Part of the Poppet series, she can share clothing with any of the other paper dolls in that series.

First off, I want to say thank you for all the kind words I got while I was taking my week off. It was needed and it let me regroup a little. I’ll admit openly that this last few months have been among the crazier in my life.

Secondly, this week’s theme is for a vintage inspired school girl look which owes a lot to the Betsy McCall dolls and paper dolls of the 1950s and 1960s. I have always loved vintage children’s clothing, so we are starting with our unnamed member of the Poppet family and continuing with four other dresses.

Thirdly, starting next week, there will not always be a weekly theme. I’ll get more into that next Monday.

Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations Include: Betsy McCall Paper Dolls, Two-Tone Shoes, Abby Glassenberg’s Soft Toy Designs, and The Color Lavender

Now, as I said, I didn’t name today’s paper doll. I just don’t know if naming dolls where I am never going to reuse the same face makes sense. Like it makes sense to me that maybe someone likes say 1830s Greta and therefore wants to see if there’s a Creepy Ghost Greta, but since I won’t ever use the face of this paper doll again, does it matter if she has a name?

I am thinking on this and I haven’t decided the future of naming the Poppets.

These are the questions that try men’s souls. Really.

Anyway, you can follow the blog on Twitter @paperpersonas and, if you love it, consider supporting it through Patreon.

Need more clothes for today’s Poppet paper doll? Find Additional Outfits Here.

Peony in the 1860s: A Dress from January 1864


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A paper doll dress from January 1864 based on a fashion plate from Le Follet. Free to print from paperthinpersonas.com.

I seemed to me that I should close up the week with a winter dress from 1864. A dress that speaks to snow and city streets. In my head, I picture Peony wrapping up in this velvet coat trimmed in soft white fur and heading out to shop for the holidays. I had looked for a plate from 1865 (that’s when the Civil War ended), but I fell in love with this winter dress from 1864. A year early, but I hope people don’t mind. Technically, the war ended in May 1865, so I guess I’m still safely in my Civil War era theme.

And to go with the coat, I had to create a muff. I love muffs, but don’t think they would be practical today since I need my fingers for driving and things.

I simplified the coat a bit, because I couldn’t seem to figure-out what was going on with the sleeves in the fashion plate. I thought they were maybe bracelet length, but then maybe not, based on her raised arm… Anyway, in the end, you can’t really see the sleeves thanks to the width of the skirt. One advantage of those wide skirts from Civil War era children’s clothing.

A fashion plate from Le Follet dated January 1864. Originally from the Casey Fashion Plate index.

This particular coat comes from a fashion plate from Le Follet. Le Follet is yet another French fashion publication. It came out weekly from 1829 to 1871, making it useful for tracing 19th century French fashions. Like all fashion magazines, it is important to remember that the plates show an idealized and fantasy version of contemporary fashion.

Women didn’t actually dress in these outfits anymore than women today dress like what we see in Vogue. However, these images offer a window into what women aspired to look like. In short, the these images are a fantasy of the idealized world of glorious dresses and domestic life.

So, this ends our little foray into 1860s or Civil War era children’s clothing for the Poppet Paper Doll series. I’m a little sad to see it wrap as I have had a lot fun showing the fashion plates and talking about the era. If you missed a post, they are all linked below.

A Printable Paper Doll & Her Wardrobe of Civil War Era Children’s Clothing

I’ve had some questions about printing, so I want to mention this: When you print, you must make sure “fit to page” is NOT selected. That should give you the same size prints as before. I also do not recommend printing from the PNGs, because you can not control how your printer treats the file. This lack of control makes sizing a problem.

Importnat announcement: I’ve split up my personal and blog related twitter feeds. The new twitter feed for the blog is here. So, that will be home for the blog updates from now on.

As always, if you love the blog, consider supporting it on Patreon or just leave a comment. I always love comments. 🙂

Peony in the 1860s: A Paper Doll Dress from August 1862


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A paper doll with a dress from August 1862, boots and a hat from paperthinpersonas.com. Part of a week of civil war children's clothing designs for the Poppets paper doll series.This week I’m diving into civil war children’s clothing with the help of the Casey Fashion Plate Index from the Los Angeles Public Library. This fantastic resource has literally hundreds of fashion plates. Today’s Poppet dress comes from Magasin des Demoiselles, a French fashion magazine of the 19th century.

I named today’s Poppet paper doll Peony. I thought I was out of P flower names, but I never did a Peony, so Peony it is! Then I’ll have to decide what to do about Poppet paper dolls and their P names.

Despite what I was once told in a costume history class, children of the 19th century didn’t dress like miniature adults. There were, in fact, many complex social rules governing how children were dressed.

While adult women did not expose their arms unless they were attending a ball (or swimming, sometimes), children could have short sleeves, especially in the heat of summer. Today’s dress is and example of this from August 1862. I simplified some of the trimming and chose blue tonal color scheme over the red and black scheme of the original Civil War children’s clothing dress design.

Fashion plate from Casey fashion plate collection from August 1862 featuring two women and a child.

Alternatively, you can download the black and white version from the links at the top of the post.

Peony’s hat is trimmed in contrasting yellow roses and matching blue ribbon. Her boots are flat soled and side lacing, which was typical for civil war era shoes. Side laced and button up boots were both worn in the 1860s, but by the end of the decade button boots were much more popular. Her stockings should really be tights or held up by a garter belt, but in the interest of making things simpler, I decided to ignore that particular fact of history.

Should you be worried about her going commando, than fear not- she’ll get some proper undergarments on Accessory Thursday.

If you need another set of dolls to wear this clothing, here’s more of the Poppet family, just be sure to print them from the PDF without fit to page and everything should work out.

Thoughts? Comments? Solutions to my “P flower names” problem? As always, I love to hear from y’all and if you like the blog, consider supporting it by becoming a Patron.

Peach in the Park: A Victorian Printable Paper Doll

logo-peach-parkToday’s Poppet paper doll is all about Victorian children’s clothing of the late 1860s and early 1870s. I love Victorian children’s clothing. I just love it. I even love it in the 1840s when I generally think all the clothing looks really stupid.

I think it is a combination of my natural fascination with childhood studies and exposure to books like The Little Princess at a young and impressionable age. It is likely also because I have a fondness for the idea of antique dolls with little wardrobes of perfectly sewn clothing pieces. The Little Princess was full of dolls. Anyone else remember that book?

And I am not talking about the Shirley Temple movie version where her father wasn’t really dead. I’ve never forgiven them for changing that part.

Anyway, we have Peach, a new Poppet paper doll, with an elegant promenade costume from Godey’s Lady’s Magazine in 1969. Her fashion doll also has a Promenade costume from that same fashion plate. I couldn’t find a decent reproduction of the plate online. Because Godey’s plates folded out, when people digitize the bound volumes they rarely take the time to fold out the plates. The result is that the text is reproduced, but not the folded plate. This is one of my pet peeves about mass digitization projects.

Back to the paper doll- Peach has, of course, a French fashion doll with her who I have left unnamed. Her fashion doll has a walking dress of her own with a hat attached. I have rarely drawn something as small as the fashion doll and I am worried a little about the fit of the gown. I did a quick Photoshop fit test, but you might want to leave some black border for wiggle room on that one. I love the whole paper dolls with their own dolls which are also paper dolls thing. It is hard to pull off though.

poppet-1870s-victorian-historical-paper-doll-peach-color poppet-1870s-victorian-historical-paper-doll-peach-black-white
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Anyway, I used several sources when working on today’s paper doll. The doll herself is based on the brown-complexioned bisque bebe dolls produced in France and Germany by companies like Steiner, Bru, Jumeau and many others. You can see some examples of these dolls on my Pinterest Board about Antique dolls. These dolls were most common in the late 19th century. As I mentioned above, her dress is from an 1869 Godey’s Lady’s Journal fashion plate. I used Dover’s excellent book- 80 Godey’s Full-Color Fashion Plates, 1838-1880 (ISBN: 978-0486402222), now out of print, for the 1869 plate. I know there are lots of sources online today for fashion plates, but too many of them omit the context of the plates, since plates were often cut. That is why I like having books of fashion plates in my collection for reference.

Next week, I will share a related Poppet clothing set with some underwear from the 1870s- when even children wore staybands or corsets- and two more outfits and a ballgown for her doll. Also, another pair of shoes with stockings.

I really do have to draw more historical children’s clothing for the Poppets. I had far to much fun with this set.

Remember that you’ll need to cut along the shoulders of the paper doll, so that she can wear her dress.