B&B A Super Cute Sci-Fi Paper Doll


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Space, the Final Frontier…

A super cute sci-fi alien paper doll printable with orange skin, wild red hair and three pieces of clothing. Part of the Bodacious and Buxom paper doll series, she can wear any of their clothing. Free to print for personal use

A super cute sci-fi alien paper doll printable with three pieces of clothing. Part of the Bodacious and Buxom paper doll series, she can wear any of their clothing. Free to print for personal use.

I grew up watching Star Trek: The Next Generation. My mother used to let me stay up an extra 30 minutes to watch the show with her. I have fond memories of Captain Picard and Co. running about the galaxy. I haven’t bought it yet, but I desperately want this book that came out recently about the costuming of Star Trek.

I remember reading once, I don’t know where, that they were never supposed to show zippers on anything in the future.

Anyway, whenever I draw aliens I think of Star Trek.

This is, for those of you counting, the first Buxom and Bodacious doll of 2017 and the 44th post in their series. Not bad really. If you think she need some more sci-fi/futuristic clothing to wear (and what alien paper doll doesn’t want an expansive wardrobe) then I would recommend last week’s retro sci-fi outfit, maybe some of Dragon Queen’s Dresses or maybe the fun of the first B&B doll’s cyperpunk wardrobe.

So, I gave her two pairs of shoes, because with this orange skin tone, she ain’t sharing with anyone. Though I think the black and white shoes are pretty flexible. An old Pixie paper doll named Jai inspired her crazy updo.

I love giving aliens insane hairstyles. Actually, I love giving all my paper dolls insane hairstyles. Probably because I wear my hair in a low ponytail all the time.

I bet I’ve asked this before, but here I go again. Are there any other Star Trek fans out there? What’s your favorite series? Let me know in a comment.

I grew up on Star Trek: The Next Generation, but my heart belongs to Star Trek: Deep Space Nice.

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Marisole Monday & Friends Paper Dolls Get Some 1970s Clothing


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Simplicity 9370 from 1971
A super cute bright yellow jumpsuit from 1971 based on the art on a vintage sewing pattern cover. Available in color or black and white.

A super cute jumpsuit from 1971 based on the art on a vintage sewing pattern cover. Available in color or black and white.

So, I work in batches. This doesn’t just mean I tend to draw a batch of the same paper doll series together, it also means I sometimes draw the same themes together. For example, I drew today’s jumpsuit around the same time I drew the my 1970s Mini-Maiden. Sometimes, I get into a theme, like 1970s clothing, and want to spend some time there.

Then I promptly get over and am distracted by some other thing. That’s the nature of my brain.

Today’s jumpsuit was based on a 1971 Simplicity sewing pattern cover. Apparently the pattern was designed to be sewn quickly and only took two different pattern pieces. I loved the cheery bright yellow color in the cover art, so I kept it.

The wide brown belt was from the pattern cover, but it also was nice because it split up the jumpsuit. I think jumpsuits really need belts, don’t you?

This is probably the last piece of 1970s clothing for the paper dolls for a while. As I said above, I tend to be a bit flighty in my paper doll interests. I have been feeling very “over the top princess gowns” lately, so stay tuned for some of that, also I have been dabbling in the 1870s.

Out of the curiosity, which do you like better for the fashion- the 1970s, the 1870s or the 1770s?

I have so confess to being a pretty big 1870s fan. Let me know your favorite in a comment.

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Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Lady Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

The Curvy B&B Paper Dolls Get Some Retro Sci-fi Madness


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Retro Sci-fi Cover Art, Specifically Wandl the Invader

The Curvy B&B Paper Dolls Get Some Retro Sci-fi Madness.

I’ve always had a soft place in my heart for pulp novels of all kinds, particularly their cover art. So, today’s sci-fi outfit for the B&B printable paper doll series was inspired by this cover art for Wandl the Invader. I mean, how could anyone see that cover art and not think, “Wow, I should draw that for a paper doll?”

Of course, I think that a lot when I see odd things in this world which goes a long way to explaining why I have PTP.

Anyhow, Wandl the Invader first came out in 1932, but the edition I found on Pinterest looks like it is from the 1950s, based on the style. The author, Ray Cummings, wrote over 750 novels and short stories which is pretty astonishing. Like a lot of pulp authors of his day, he was astonishingly prolific.

Along with pulp sci-fi cover art, I’ve also always had a soft place in my heart for retro-futurism. In fact, I recently started a Pinterest board devoted to the retro-futuristic fashions. I think this today’s outfit is a little retro-futuristic (is that a word?) along with being very pulpy.

A friend of my retro sci-fi look in theme, if not in paper doll series, was my astronaut from last October.

I wish I could think of more to say here, but I am writing this post after a thirteen hour day at work and I just want to wash this makeup off (I don’t usually wear makeup) and crawl into my bed.

So, I’m wrapping things up here.

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Need to get a Bodacious & Buxom paper doll to wear these fabulous clothes? Pick one out here.

Zachary: A Modern African-American Guy Paper Doll


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  What I see College Guys Wearing, But With More Color
A casually dressed African-American guy paper doll with shorts, sandals and short hair. Part of the Sprites series, he can share clothing with of the other Sprites guys. Free to print in color or black and white.

Back when the Sprites started, I had planned to start with a lady paper doll as the first Sprite. However, I’d decided to name them in reverse alphabetical order. I find if I have a naming scheme it makes coming up with paper doll names easier.

So, I was stuck with starting with Z. There just aren’t that many names that start with Z, so I started with Zachary here instead of starting with Yumiko.

I’m sure you all really cared about this random piece of paper doll blog history.

Anyway, I do think there are advantages to contemporary dolls. I think they sort of act as basic options. There’s no colorful hair here, so this version of Zachary could be a mermaid or he could be going to the park or borrowing this nifty elf armor, The point is that he’s a bit more neutral than the two pervious Zachary versions I have created.

Tomorrow, there will be a contemporary fashion Ursula to join Zachary.

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Looking for something for today’s Sprite paper doll to wear? Pick out some clothing here.

Ms. Mannequin: On Future Streets, Again


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: Cyberpunk Fashion and my 2014 paper doll set- On Future Streets
A bright and colorful set of cyberpunk paper doll clothing. Fits any of the Ms. Mannequin paper dolls. Download and print for free.

Last year, I decided I would draw some paper dolls based on older sets I have as a way to revisiting older work. So, today’s Ms. Mannequin outfit was inspired by this cyberpunk paper doll clothing set called “On Future Streets” that I created in 2014.

The amount of cyberpunk stuff I draw for the paper dolls is directly proportional to the amount of Shadowrun I am playing at any given time. So, given that my usual group has gathered once more to play, I suspect 2017 will have more in the cyperpunk paper doll clothing genre.

I like revisiting my older sets for two reasons:

  1. It helps me get ideas when I don’t have any ideas. A totally blank piece of paper is both the most inspiring and the most scary thing in the world.
  2. It helps me write about the post when I have to write the post. Because writing about these paper doll outfits is sometimes the hardest thing.

So, I have the following things to say about this paper doll outfit today.

  1. I did wanted to make something that could be cyberpunk, but could also just be scifi. I totally can imagine someone from 5th Element wearing this get up. Actually, all the costumes in the 5th Element are amazing. I love that movie.
  2. Making things look shiny is a skill I was really out of practice at. I used to be so good at it. I shall have to practice more. Shiny things here I come!
  3. Writing blog posts as numbered lists is actually kinda fun. I should do this more often.

As always, if you love PTP and want to donate to keep it up on the internets, please consider becoming a Patron. If you just want to know what I’m up too then you can follow it on Twitter. And if you want to make me feel less alone on the internet, leave a comment.

Tell me- Are you excited about more cyberpunk paper doll clothing?

Need a paper doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick out a Ms. Mannequin Paper Doll Here

Poppet’s Snowy Fantasy Burgundian Gown


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Burgundian gowns, Like this one

Today's fantasy paper doll gown was inspired by the Burgundian gowns of the mid to late 1400s, snowflakes and the color lavender. Download and print for free!

Today’s fantasy gown was inspired by the Burgundian gowns of the mid to late 1400s. The style was worn by women of wealth and status. This manuscript illustration of Fortune and her Wheel is particularly nice.

Now, my fantasy version hasn’t got a lot in common with this, but I really wanted to capture the spirit of the gown which, when I was a child, was something I always thought was worn by Princesses.

So, let’s talk about “Burgundian Gowns”, shall we? Here’s a nice article about how to make your own, plus some good pictures from A Damsel In This Dress. The term “Burgundian Gown” refers to the Duchy of Burgundy which was the leading fashion center of the time.

In the 1400s, the Duchy of Burgundy was Belguim, the Netherlands and parts of northern France. While England and France were busy duking it out in the Hundred Years War, this area became the cultural center of Europe.

The gowns, in the real world, consist of two parts. The kirtle and then a gown over it. The gown was lined in fur that showed when it was folded back to reveal the kirtle underneath. In my fantasy version, that’s the lace and ribbon trimmed part that’s visible in the deep v-neck of the outer gown.

Since it is winter outside, I chose to decorate my gown with a snowflake pattern.

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My Curvy Paper Dolls And A Dress from 1820


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This Dress from 1820 in the Philadelphia Museum of Art and these shoes from 1815-1825 in the Bata Shoe Museum 

A dress from 1820 for the B&B curvy paper doll series based on a gown from the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

A dress from 1820 for the B&B curvy paper doll series based on a gown from the Philadelphia Museum of Art to color and print.

The 1820s fascinate me as a fashion era, because there is a clear evolution from the beginning of the decade to the end of the decade. In the beginning of the 1820s, the era this dress comes from, the waist was still quite high as you can see from this 1820 fashion plate. By the end of the decade, it has dropped to the natural waist, as you can see from this 1829 fashion plate.

The green gown for the B&B series is based off this dress from 1820, though I added the clasp detail on the belt. I love the three-dimensional padded appliques that were a common form of decoration in this era. I wanted to make it clear in my paper doll dress from 1820 that the designs were raised. I think that part of it came out well. I did not keep the striped pattern on the original dress. I thought it would be way to hard to not lose the applique leaf pattern if I did that. So, my version is a bit simpler in style. The shoes are based on this pair from the Bata Shoe Museum in Canada.

A few other notes about today’s dress. I’m not sure what the formality of a dress like this would have been in 1820. I am included to think it is a formal dress, but not really a ballgown. I think maybe a dinner dress? Something for half-dress, anyway. It’s not as informal as undress and not as formal as full-dress. Any thoughts from y’all?

Short sleeves would indicate evening wear after the 1820s, but during the era it is such a transitional period that I am hard pressed to guess exactly what the “rules” were for ladies. As I often say in these situations, I should do more research!

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Marisole Monday & Friends in 1830s Fashion


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: This 1830 fashion plate, Bonnets
A green 1830s paper doll dress based on a fashion plate from 1830 with a matching bonnet and shoes from paperthinpersonas.com.

I’ve written before that the 1830s are a period of fashion I find a little absurd looking. Yet, the more I draw clothing from those years, the more it grows on me.

I am starting to almost like the era. Just almost.

So, a quick overview of the fashions of this era shows an abundance of sleeves and bonnets. If the three decades from 1800 to 1830 were the era of the column silhouette, than the 1830s were the era of the oval. The sloping shoulders, wide-sleeves, round bonnets, and full skirts all give a oval shape to the silhouette.

Plus, the wide skirts and sleeves also emphasized the desirable small waist, often accented with a belt.  The invention of metal eyelets in 1828 allowed for a much tighter fit on a corset. There was no longer the danger of the lacing cutting through the hand-sewn eyelet due to tight lacing. So, waists got smaller.

Like the earlier part of the century, people were still super into the Ancient Civilizations.  So, references to the Roman and Greek civilizations abound. Hairstyles have names like Apollo’s Knot, one of the dumbest looking hairstyles ever. The hair in this fashion plate is an Apollo’s Knot style and so is this. It was very popular. And, clearly, not one of my favorites.

Anyway, this 1830 fashion plate from the Casey Fashion Plate Index inspired today’s outfit.  As hard as it is to believe, I actually simplified the bonnet from the original drawing. Bonnets are not my forte, so I have mixed feelings about how this one turned out.

All in all, however, I think I didn’t do a bad job on today’s foray into 1830s fashion.

What do you think? More of this era in order? Not a favorite?

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Marisole Monday Goes to the Circus


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations: The Wonderful Paintings of Amy Lind and Circuses
A paper doll circus costume in teal and pink. Free to print in color or black and white for coloring.

A paper doll circus costume with a really rocking top hat. Free to print in color or black and white for coloring.

Today, there is a circus costume for the Marisole Monday & Friend’s printable paper doll series.

So, I use two things to sort the paper dolls. One is categories, like Poppets or Marisole Monday & Friends. The other is tags, like cyberpunk, Vikings or blond hair. Every few months, I go through the tags to make sure I haven’t misspelled something and/or made a tag I shouldn’t have. While I as doing that a few months ago, I noticed that some of my tags had only one item in them. This seemed sad, so I decided to draw sets for a few of those areas. The ones I focused on were Astronauts, Circuses and Ninjas.

Okay, kinda an odd list, but whatever. On Friday, there will be a new Ninja outfit for the Mini-Maiden series. Today, we have a circus inspired clothing for Marisole Monday & Friends. This will join the Ms. Mannequin circus outfit and the original Marisole Monday & Friends Circus paper doll set in color or black and white under the Circus tag.

Is all that clear as mud?

Excellent! So, today’s paper doll is really about embracing circus themed things, but not doing red and gold. I have done a lot of red and gold and I wanted to do something different. When I saw this panting by Amy Lind on my Circus Pinterest board, I knew I had my new color scheme for today’s circus costume. And then I gave her totally impractical shoes, because nothing says “performer of great skill” like shoes you probably can’t actually walk in.

Maybe that’s her circus act- walking in highly improbable shoes.

What do you think? What would be a good circus act to wear today’s circus costume in? Because when it comes to paper dolls, the costume is way more important then the actual act. Let’s be honest here.

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Need a Marisole Monday & Friends Paper Doll to wear today’s outfit? Pick One Out Here

The Sprites Go Contemporary in Navy, Olive, Stripes and Florals


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Today’s Printable Paper Doll Inspirations:  Flower Fairies, Cicely Mary Barker and the Book, Fairie-ality
The Sprites printable paper dolls get a pair of contemporary paper doll outfits. One is a skirt and a t-shirt with flutter sleeves, plus a scarf. For the gents, there is a long sleeved t-shirt and a pair of cargo pants. Print in color or black and white.

The Sprites printable paper dolls get a pair of contemporary paper doll outfits. One is a skirt and a t-shirt with flutter sleeves, plus a scarf. For the gents, there is a long sleeved t-shirt and a pair of cargo pants. Print and color.

Today, the Sprites printable paper dolls get a pair of contemporary paper doll outfits. One is a skirt and a t-shirt with flutter sleeves, plus a scarf. For the gents, there is a long sleeved t-shirt and a pair of cargo pants. Do guys even still wear cargo pants? I have no idea.

Drawing contemporary paper doll outfits comes with challenges that are unique. First of all, after a while, things start to look the same. Secondly, how many t-shirts can any rational person draw before going just a little mad? Probably not that many. I swear guy paper doll outfits exist just to vex me.

Still, I try to come up with ideas to spice things up whenever possible. With the Sprites part of the fun is coming up with a “guy” and a “girl” outfit that would go together. In this case, I settled on two casual outfits with Autumnal color schemes. The colors are really what ties these two paper doll looks together.

Color schemes are their own challenge, because most guys aren’t really keen on magenta. Though I must confess, I do think sometimes my idea of masculine colors is pretty old fashioned. I’ve seen a lot of male college students where I work in colors that I wouldn’t have thought they would wear. So, perhaps I need to open my mind to guy paper dolls and pink.

Meanwhile, I love that skirt and I would totally wear it, if it existed in my size and made of fabric. I think it is super cute.

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